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Weight loss?


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This isn't fetish related at all but I used to come to omo.org a lot when I was younger and met a lot of nice people that made me feel supported and comfortable. I'm getting back into omorashi now and figured I'd try asking here. I'm kinda overweight now. I put on a lot of weight during the pandemic and am now trying to get it back off. Any weight loss tips would be amazing and I'd love to find an accountability partner on here. I'm not great at healthy weight loss. I'm mostly interested in getting back to a body I'm comfortable with quickly. Anyone else having weight struggles and want to talk about it?

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Speaking of my own experience as i did a life style changes about 10 years ago. I weighted around 170 kg for my heavist and just decided to get rid of the extra mass and get a healtier life with more exercise and movement in my everyday life. I didnt started any diet just cut my calories intake by eating reasonable and smaller amounts of food, i didnt separate any foods to be bad or good just eating smaller portions of any everyday food.

It wasnt easy at the start as anyone can imagine but after a couple of months with my new eating style it got easier and i have carried this over the years now and dont need to think this activly anymore. Now my weight is around 90 kg and been around this atleast 5 or 6 years now. Before i have tested many diets but they are not for me, the lifestyle change was the key in my case. Hope you manage to achieve your goals too.

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Me and my wife are both heavy and have been heavy our whole lives.

Between the two of us, we have lost around 80 pounds over the last couple of years.   Though we both still are significantly overweight.  

Its all been though significant modifications to our diet.

1.) We used to dine out or carry out or order delivery a lot and overeat when dining out.
Now, we dine our or order carry out around 1/2 to 1/4 as often.  

2.) We used to eat lots of meat every meal.   We would more or less eat over a pound of meat every day. 
We cut back on our meat intake by like 40% or so.

3.) We cut our carbs around 50% or so.  More or less stopped drinking sugary drinks.  We at less bread/toast.  When we have potatoes or rice, we eat less of it.

4.) Since we hate being hungry,  we increased the amount of healthy food we eat so we more or less still enjoy our meals and feel satisfied.  

5.) We both still really love food.  We use lots of fresh garlic, and spices when cooking, and even if the meals arent as "rich" as we used to eat,  we still make them delicious. 

In the past, our meals might have been something like 45% meat, 35% carbs, 20% veggies/fruit.   

Now,  our meals are more like 25% meat, 20% carbs, and 55% veggies/fruit. 

Since they are still delicious, we don't really feel like we are missing out or making too many sacrifices.   This way,  it should be sustainable for the long haul.  Or, at least until our doctors stop scaring us.

Its a LOT more work to cook/prep meals from scratch,   but,  its been very much worth it on my case.  Hope others can find similar success.  Good luck to you all.

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11 hours ago, hamburgertime said:

Me and my wife are both heavy and have been heavy our whole lives.

Between the two of us, we have lost around 80 pounds over the last couple of years.   Though we both still are significantly overweight.  

Its all been though significant modifications to our diet.

1.) We used to dine out or carry out or order delivery a lot and overeat when dining out.
Now, we dine our or order carry out around 1/2 to 1/4 as often.  

2.) We used to eat lots of meat every meal.   We would more or less eat over a pound of meat every day. 
We cut back on our meat intake by like 40% or so.

3.) We cut our carbs around 50% or so.  More or less stopped drinking sugary drinks.  We at less bread/toast.  When we have potatoes or rice, we eat less of it.

4.) Since we hate being hungry,  we increased the amount of healthy food we eat so we more or less still enjoy our meals and feel satisfied.  

5.) We both still really love food.  We use lots of fresh garlic, and spices when cooking, and even if the meals arent as "rich" as we used to eat,  we still make them delicious. 

In the past, our meals might have been something like 45% meat, 35% carbs, 20% veggies/fruit.   

Now,  our meals are more like 25% meat, 20% carbs, and 55% veggies/fruit. 

Since they are still delicious, we don't really feel like we are missing out or making too many sacrifices.   This way,  it should be sustainable for the long haul.  Or, at least until our doctors stop scaring us.

Its a LOT more work to cook/prep meals from scratch,   but,  its been very much worth it on my case.  Hope others can find similar success.  Good luck to you all.

Using spices was something I should've brought up.  As much as we want to eat healthy, a lot of the healthier foods out there just don't taste that good, or have little taste at all, without some sort of seasoning.  Getting more creative with your cooking can address that.

It's also a way to make your diet more palatable if you find yourself having to live on a budget (especially if you're a student) and, consequently, not having as much variety in what exactly you eat.  Varying how you cook it and changing up the spices with each dish can trick your brain into believing it isn't eating the exact same stuff every day.

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Not sure if this helps but I used to weigh almost 400 pounds, since I wanted to just die and get it over with for a while.  It wasn't until I realized I was blaming life for my personal problems that I started being able to deal with it more, starting about 2 years ago now.  I have been consistently losing weight ever since then without having to work too hard on it, besides the time it took to get here, I have lost maybe 200 pounds or more at this point.

Anyway that was all just for context so here is basically what I've done to make this possible:

I started cooking all my own food using mostly vegetarian ingredients because I can tell my stomach deals with that kind of thing better, even if I get hungry again sooner, I just feel better and less drowsy in general compared to eating a big meal with meat in it.  I try to stay busy working on stuff and drink almost only ice water even when I'm not feeling like being physically active, and don't drink soda too often.  Also I make sure to get enough sleep every single night so I always feel up to continuing my healthier habits.  That is mostly what I've been doing this whole time, and I can even still snack on sugary stuff, candy, or pizza sometimes too pretty much whenever I want to.  every day I wake up weighing just a little less, it was freaking me out at first because I had dreamed of it for so long I was worried I was dying or something, but yeah not even close apparently haha

hope some of this helps somehow!

Edited by Oceanus
remembered something else (see edit history)
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Unfortunately, there isn't really a way to do it "quickly".

It depends on how you want to approach it. Do you feel like it's your diet? Lack of exercise? Perhaps a mixture of both?

I've done just about every "fad" diet/program there is, and I honestly did better by changing small habits at a time. If you go all in at once, you'll burn out and give up quickly.

More than happy to respond to you with tips/tricks/ideas, but there needs to be a baseline of what to go off. What is your current diet like? Do you stress eat? How often do you work out (even things like walking!)? 

If enough people are interested, we could create a chat-thread in the OmoOrg server to discuss/throw ideas off each other!

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I'm busy a lot and tend to both stress and habit over eat and under eat. I have a hard time managing to consistently eat healthy. Everytime I feel like I'm getting into a pattern that I can sustain by brother or dad pushes me into bingeing on pizza or some other takeout junk. I weigh 225 which is the heaviest I've been in my life. Two years ago I weighed 170 lbs. Which I was kind of happy with. I usually get at least 8000 steps on my Fitbit but I fluctuate between being very active and not very at all. I'm not healthy now. This is the 4th time in my life that I've put on weight like this and really want to fix it for real this time. 

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The best thing ive found doing is dont force a diet, eat in moderation. If you just cut anything you like entirely you are more likely to relapse and overeat again. Also, its good to make a list of what you like to eat healthy wise and find ways to plan out making meals ahead of time if you don’t have time to throw together something for that day. I weighed almost 260lbs last year and i cut out fast food entirely to only once a week as a treat, the rest of the time, i eat what i buy and stick with it.  I also do fasting and eat the majority of my calories in the morning because eating a big meal at the beginning of the day helps you not gain weight as much, ive gone down to 232 as of right now. Everyone is different though, experiment a bit and find a system that works the best for you.

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The main thing for me has been

1.) cardio. you can either finesse a machine from someone who's not using it or go to a gym and 

2.) Establishing a routine. I go at the same time every week.

 

It's going to suck for like the first week but then it'll feel good. Great way to boost your mood without resorting to treats! ( I still resort to treats sometimes)

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Diet is more important than exercise. Speaking as someone who is physically fit but got some belly due to eating fast food, I'd recommend going for a vegetarian or lean-meat diet, and incorporate a lot of protein and fiber instead of carbs. Lean meats include chicken and fish, but honestly vegetarian is the best if you are concerned with body image over raw strength. I like using lentils and quinoa-based food, high volume foods that make you feel fuller without consuming as many calories.

No sugar. Avoid any sweets, candy, soda, ice cream, sweet dressings, etc.

You really don't need to work out extensively if you eat right.

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On 9/22/2021 at 3:55 PM, MangaKitten said:

I'm busy a lot and tend to both stress and habit over eat and under eat. I have a hard time managing to consistently eat healthy. Everytime I feel like I'm getting into a pattern that I can sustain by brother or dad pushes me into bingeing on pizza or some other takeout junk. I weigh 225 which is the heaviest I've been in my life. Two years ago I weighed 170 lbs. Which I was kind of happy with. I usually get at least 8000 steps on my Fitbit but I fluctuate between being very active and not very at all. I'm not healthy now. This is the 4th time in my life that I've put on weight like this and really want to fix it for real this time. 

Sorry for taking a while to respond to this.

I think primarily you want to set yourself a routine where you're eating regularly. When you get into that routine, you can then work on portions and making sure all your meals are balanced. 

Also just remember that having a takeout here or there isn't ruining anything, you just get back to your routine the next day.

8000 isn't that bad per day, it means that you're moderately active... so at least you're not stationary too much! 
 

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I lost 65lbs in four months in 2018. I've kept it off.

Few things: 1) the most important thing -- by far -- is that you have to want to lose the weight *for you*. Not for anyone else, or for society, your doctor, or for anything other than your own happiness. If you don't feel good at your weight and you would like to lose some then you should absolutely embrace a weight loss journey. There's very few things in my life that have made me feel prouder than losing that weight, but it only happened when I fully understood that it was what *I* wanted. 2) Throw the scale out. Seriously. The number isn't what you want -- not really -- and it's not going to be what ultimately makes you feel successful. For me, it was about looking better in my clothes so I bought a really trendy shirt that was way too tight on me and worked until it fit me. I weighed myself once at the start and once after so I had a number I could tell people, but the rest of the time it was all about how I felt, not a number on a scale (that goes up and down for reasons we can't control anyway). 3) Have a concrete goal. That could be a 5k, or to fit into a hot outfit for a reunion, or...whatever. Mine was to shock people when I walked back into a group I hung out with after them not seeing me for four months.  That group is part of an activity that runs from March to November, so I wanted to turn heads in March. It worked 😉 4) You can't out train a bad diet. The gym matters, but changing your diet is more important.  I cut out all junk food and followed a 16/8 intermittent fasting routine. That works for me (I still follow it), but no two people are the same. You just need to find a way to make sure you are putting less in than you are burning off. 5) Find exercise that makes you happy. I love to run. It makes me feel good. But, you're not me. You have to enjoy the activity you are doing so you keep it up. Find your thing. 6) That said, add weights to the routine. It doesn't have to be cray intense, but even doing a simple shoulders, arms, chest, squat routine 3x a week will do wonders. You'll see a difference within 4 weeks if you stick to it. 7) Lastly, remember it's about your happiness. If you aren't feeling good...reflect and adjust. Good luck!  

Edited by NotARealName1
grammar fix (see edit history)
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On 10/28/2021 at 2:53 PM, LizJWetting said:

Through much of my teens I was quite slim, but ever since then I've been slowly putting on weight, a bit more so over the last few years so I'm now a bit heavier than I'd like. But as much as I say I'd like to lose some weight again, I often can't seem to find the motivation to actually do much about it so naturally nothing changes. I don't really have any advice for you then, but I do know how you feel.

 

This has been my experience.

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I'll add info here from an outside perspective. My wife has highly variable weight, but I stay pretty much exactly put at 140 no matter what I do. So mostly this advice is statistical and observational, rather than personal. But I have defeated many other shittastic habits in my life, so I think there's maybe some merit in here.

1) people vary extremely widely around weight, shape and size, and they change through the years, and some of that you simply can't control. The goal is to feel healthy, strong and capable. At my rock solid 140, I've varied from feeling sore, lethargic and clumsy, to fit, fast and sturdy, depending on diet and exercise (ok, so I guess there is a little personal story in here after all). If you feel good, stay there. If you don't, change something.

2) the one dietary nutrient you don't actually need is refined sugar. Fruit sugar, *absent fruit fibre*, has many and varied negative health effects. Naturally present sugars, whole fruit, fat-in foods, etc don't have any of the "metabolic syndrome" correlations that refined sugar does. So cutting out sugar is your big "easy" rule.

3) others said this already, but change one thing at a time, and focus on that until it's a habit (ie you can do it every day without it costing you willpower). Make sure you don't feel like you're depriving yourself of something. Sometimes we comfort-eat (or whatever) because the alternative is worse. For me it's comfort screwing.

4) don't subtract, add; the mind wants more of what it focuses on. If you try to just cut carbs for example, you'll just be thinking about all those carbs you aren't eating. Instead, add something healthy that takes up space in your stomach, like fruit or veg, even water. Or add walks, social activities, even a part time job. Introduce new healthy habits, and keep the healthy habits you've already got, and you'll effectively slide the unhealthy habits out the back door without really thinking about it. Plus you'll be spending your energy thinking about the good things you're doing, instead of the unhealthy things you wish you were doing.

5) intermittent fasting does seem to be generally better than any other diet, in terms of success factor. This is based on science I've read, but I didn't keep a list of sources so maybe go look it up yourself and see what's good. I strongly recommend curated sources like Mayo clinic, mainstream universities and colleges, and peer reviewed journals (or pressers for). Be careful with stuff on the open internet, because nutrition advice is a lucrative business.

6) for exercise: walking is awesome for general health, but the value peaks at around 7500 steps/day and it doesn't burn much fat. Losing weight (and building strength) seems to correlate with high intensity exercise, in the 85-90% heart rate category, and every little bit counts. HIIT routines seem to beat everything for effectiveness, but an underreported aspect of HIIT is that it's really intense, and if you aren't used to it you can do yourself real lasting damage. A good benchmark if you don't want to wear a heart rate monitor is that the fat burn heartrate band feels "a little uncomfortable." If you feel "very uncomfortable" or worse, slow down; if you're not a little uncomfortable, speed up.

7) weight bearing, moderate impact exercise is really important for health and mobility later in life, and doing it while you're young matters, but it's also never too late. Your joints need the muscles around them to be strong, in order to resist wear and tear on cartilage and ligaments. It's not exactly weight loss advice but it's important, and it's certainly compatible with weight loss.

...that's what I can remember right now.

 

TLDR: if you feel good, you are good. Don't worry about trying to kill bad habits; instead, add healthy habits, one at a time, until they're easy. Healthy habits include (but not limited to) more whole fruit and veg, more fiber, more water, long walks, high intensity cardio, weight lifting, socializing, doing meaningful work, having adventures, and so on.

Hope this helps!

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Here's my tips:

1) At the simplest level, it boils down to "calories in, calories out".  Try not to overeat, and space your meals out into more smaller meals throughout the day (instead of 3 meals, you should really be having 4-6).  Don't worry too much about carbs or fats specifically, though I will suggest having a varied diet.  Try to cut down the trans-fats as well (less red meat, more fish).  Try to avoid processed foods as well, eat fresh fruit, veggies, and meat when possible.

2) Exercise, seriously.  Most diets fail because your metabolism fights your attempt to lose weight, if you start getting active, you'll use more of your fat reserves.  It doesn't need to be particularly heavy either, just do some situps or something simple.

3) Cut out sodas, even diet sodas.  There's something about them that increases insulin production and makes your body store more fat.

4) Be mindful of your stress levels.  Cortisol, a stress-related hormone, is also responsible for you putting on and retaining a lot of weight.  Try not to get too worked up about things, as much as possible.

5) Don't push too hard too quickly.  Take it one step at a time in degrees you can handle.

Edited by D0nt45k (see edit history)
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I’m starting simple personally. Lots of meal planning and prep work to take out the excuse to order food or eat unhealthy frozen stuff. Plus biking about 4-6 miles a day during the week and 10-15 on weekend days. I do some volunteer work that involves hiking and looking for people/things in inclement weather so that helps a ton as well. 

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