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Omorashi language in Chinese


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On 6/10/2021 at 12:11 AM, China Girl said:

Since I have linked some content from China recently I thought I might want to introduce you to some of the terms used for omorashi in my country. The Chinese word for it is "漏尿" which literally means "leak pee". You can see it used as the title of the Chinese Wikipedia article for example. Another very common expression is simply "尿裤子" or "pee pants". 尿 is pee obviously. If you want to get some cute results I would suggest searching "美女尿裤子", which means "pretty lady pee pants". This will get plenty of good content like what I shared earlier. In terms of desperation, "急的尿裤子" means about to pee pants and suggests desperation. 厕所 is toilet. If you like to see skirts, as I do, then 裙子 is skirt.

I hope this will help you to find cute content that otherwise you would not see. You will find plenty of cute results by searching for these.

any sites you recommend to search?

 

Also, is it common/popular in china for this fetish?

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On 6/9/2021 at 9:11 AM, China Girl said:

美女尿裤子

Thank you for the links.

BTW, regarding "fat poor":  At least in this town, food banks always have excess bread.  Consequently, a person can walk in and ask for just bread -- no registration, no waiting.  They immediately receive 4 loaves.  They can do this repeatedly.  So people with insufficient benefits or poor self management might live almost half of each month on almost nothing but bread.  They easily get fat and foggy headed.

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5 hours ago, Cherylicious said:

any sites you recommend to search?

 

Also, is it common/popular in china for this fetish?

It's as popular as anywhere else. No more, no less. There are women who like to wet and guys who like watching that, but we mostly keep quiet about it because it's not appropriate for public conversation. I suppose it might be a little more common here since the massive population density does mean that long toilet queues for women are common, leading to more accidents and female diaper wearing that can trigger a kink. I know for my part that I only got into omorashi after I had a real accident in a sexually tense situation with my boyfriend.

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Thank you very much for the information. I want to try the Kwai app. Is there any related content?

Are there blogs in Chinese that talk about using adult diapers on long trips, etc.?

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I don't speak Chinese, but once I discovered that some/many/most chinese words can have characters removed and still mean something vaguely relevant. Thus using GOOGLE translate you find (according to GOOGLE Translate):

急的尿裤子 means Urgent peeing in pants

急的尿裤 means  Urgent diapers

急的尿 means Urgent urine

急的 means Sudden

急 means anxious

Cutting out characters in the middle also produce odd results such as

急的裤 means anxious pants

I guess that only works with Traditional Chinese characters, but it seems to make the language a little less imperetrable.

It is quite different from western languages, all the 'letters' seem to have their own meaning, and you group their meanings together to get the final meaning.

David

 

 

 

 

Edited by David_E (see edit history)
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You're getting a lot of misconceptions there. Traditional characters are used in Taiwan so you're going to get results from there. The mainland has been using simplified for decades. The individual characters represent syllables and do have their own meanings, but it works better if you put in phrases that make sense. 急的尿裤子 is like "desperate and about to pee pants". It's not a single word, we just don't put spaces between words in China. 急, 的, 尿, and 裤子 are all separate words.

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39 minutes ago, China Girl said:

You're getting a lot of misconceptions there. Traditional characters are used in Taiwan so you're going to get results from there. The mainland has been using simplified for decades. The individual characters represent syllables and do have their own meanings, but it works better if you put in phrases that make sense. 急的尿裤子 is like "desperate and about to pee pants". It's not a single word, we just don't put spaces between words in China. 急, 的, 尿, and 裤子 are all separate words.

Sorry to invervene, but I think this outlined statement is wrong. The individual characters in Chinese does not represent sounds, or syllables, like almost all the other languages. Chinese characters are logograms. A logogram is a written character that represents a word, or a morpheme. In other words, Chinese characters represent a thing, or a concept, regardless of how the word is pronounced. It works just like the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs. Therefore, you are able to read texts that are 1000s of years old, or texts were written in another East-Asian language, even if your dialect or language are very distantly related, and you wouldn't be able to understand each other if you were communicating orally.

Most written languages in the word use Alphabets. We have signs that represent a sound, or a combination of sounds. If we pronounce things differently, we will also write things differently. Therefore, when our languages have evolved, our spelling of the word has also changed.

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Well English isn't my native language so I might not have expressed that right, but yes, characters do represent syllables. Each character represents a syllable of a word. If I was going to romanise 急的尿裤子, it would be "Jí de niào kùzi", with each syllable represented by a character. There are 多音字 characters with 2 different readings dependent on context, but they're also 1 syllable each (音乐,快乐). Sometimes characters are used to spell words out based on pronunciation, like foreign place names. 纽约 is New York for example, not because it means "button approximately" or whatever but because "Niǔyuē" sounds like it.

I would really struggle to read Old Chinese. The characters have changed shape and meaning a lot and grammar has changed. Even Middle Chinese from a few hundred years back can be a struggle to be honest.

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27 minutes ago, China Girl said:

Well English isn't my native language so I might not have expressed that right, but yes, characters do represent syllables. Each character represents a syllable of a word. If I was going to romanise 急的尿裤子, it would be "Jí de niào kùzi", with each syllable represented by a character. There are 多音字 characters with 2 different readings dependent on context, but they're also 1 syllable each (音乐,快乐). Sometimes characters are used to spell words out based on pronunciation, like foreign place names. 纽约 is New York for example, not because it means "button approximately" or whatever but because "Niǔyuē" sounds like it.

I would really struggle to read Old Chinese. The characters have changed shape and meaning a lot and grammar has changed. Even Middle Chinese from a few hundred years back can be a struggle to be honest.

Yes, there is obviously phonetical elements, especially for foreign words, names and other more loosely constructed words. I don't think a purely logographic system would work in a modern society. Even the Egyptian hieroglyphs had many phonetical elements. But the core of Chinese characters are logographic, not phonetical. I don't know very much Chinese, but if you help me alittle bit, I think we can even illustrate it by example. You say 急 is pronounced "ji". I am sure you have other words that are pronounced "ji", but are written with a completely different character.

Anyway, sorry, I didn't mean to start argument. Thank you for the very helpful translations! 👍

On 6/9/2021 at 6:11 PM, China Girl said:

If you like to see skirts, as I do, then 裙子 is skirt.

Do you have a character for jeans, or pants too? That could be nice to know.

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10 hours ago, China Girl said:

I would really struggle to read Old Chinese. The characters have changed shape and meaning a lot and grammar has changed. Even Middle Chinese from a few hundred years back can be a struggle to be honest.

I think that is probably universal. I find even Shakespearian English hard to read, and anything older reads like a foreign language.

When you talk about syllable, I'm not sure you mean quite what we mean, because syllables are distinct vocal noises that mostly have no meaning at all.

Your example of writing New York sounds terrifyingly opaque!

I guess if I ever wanted to learn Chinese for real, I'd do best with a teacher like you, who peed her pants during the lesson!

Edited by David_E (see edit history)
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5 hours ago, China Girl said:

Actually I'd prefer not to do that, it would be really distracting. I imagine you'd get a giant boner LOL. Not too conducive to learning.

I might be wearing a diaper under my skirt though, just in case I need to go...

LOL - I think you are probably right!

Just getting back to 急的尿裤子 - when I decomposed it, nothing referred to pleasure. Would it be possible to add this somewhere?

性快感

For example 性快感急的尿裤子

David

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On 6/11/2021 at 8:22 AM, China Girl said:

It's as popular as anywhere else. No more, no less. There are women who like to wet and guys who like watching that, but we mostly keep quiet about it because it's not appropriate for public conversation. I suppose it might be a little more common here since the massive population density does mean that long toilet queues for women are common, leading to more accidents and female diaper wearing that can trigger a kink. I know for my part that I only got into omorashi after I had a real accident in a sexually tense situation with my boyfriend.

Something catches my attention, you say that China is a country with a very large population density, so it is more normal to see women wearing diapers without them being in omo?

And if this is how people react to seeing that girls wear diapers, it could be said that it is normally accepted

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Well you don't really "see" it. If a lady has a diaper under her dress, you don't see it unless it's windy or you're behind her on an escalator, LOL. There could be any number of women doing it, but it's not visible. Most women don't wear them and I suspect the ones who do tend to be into it to some extent. I only have 1 friend who wears diapers aside from me, that I know of.

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