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More Examples of Omo in History


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Havelock Ellis wrote accounts of inducing several women to piss themselves in public under their skirts. I believe it was on the rainy streets of London. Haven't read them in years but from what I remember it was definitely a fetish that he indulged in often as possible. Sometimes I think I could be his reincarnation.

Edited by yellowet (see edit history)
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Around 20 years ago I watched an episode of the Tom Snyder show with Tim Conway as his guest. Tim Conway was asked how he got his break into show business and he told of a time when he was a background crew member for a woman who had a live TV show in Chicago in the 1950"s I think. Anyway, he said that he got his first experience being on live TV because he had to fill in for the woman because she had wet her pants. I know it's not that exciting and he didn't go into detail about it, but at the time it certainly caught my interest.

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It would be nice if you linked sources on what you claim is true.

I don't have links because I am not an Internet guy and I found these in books rather than online. For the Irish mythological sources, try "The Cattle Raid of Cooley" for goddesses who pee rivers, and "The Death of Derbforgaill" for the peeing contest. Most of these can easily be found in any number of free pdf downloads, as myth is out of copyright. Mozart's uncensored letters have been published in an academic two volume edition. Havelock Ellis' comment is in his essay "Undinism," also an easy pdf download from many sources. The other Ellis story posted by yellowet comes from a rather smarmy paperback about the sex lives of the rich and famous. I think it was written by the late Irving Wallace, but I'm not sure. For Sennett and Mabel, see "Mabel: Hollywood's First I Don't Care Girl," by Betty Fussell. The works of James Joyce can be downloaded for free anywhere; he is one of the world's most famous writers. The bobby soxer wettings come from a personal conversation with my mother, as noted, though I don't remember where I originally heard about it. The quote about Beatles concerts... Is there really anyone who has never heard that quote before?

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9 hours ago, PStain said:

Around 20 years ago I watched an episode of the Tom Snyder show with Tim Conway as his guest. Tim Conway was asked how he got his break into show business and he told of a time when he was a background crew member for a woman who had a live TV show in Chicago in the 1950"s I think. Anyway, he said that he got his first experience being on live TV because he had to fill in for the woman because she had wet her pants. I know it's not that exciting and he didn't go into detail about it, but at the time it certainly caught my interest.

Actually, the woman he was talking about was studio staff, not who he was replacing, and she peed because she and the rest of the studio staff were laughing so hard at the way he screwed up that first experience.

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3 hours ago, dirtyoldman said:

I don't have links because I am not an Internet guy and I found these in books rather than online. For the Irish mythological sources, try "The Cattle Raid of Cooley" for goddesses who pee rivers, and "The Death of Derbforgaill" for the peeing contest. Most of these can easily be found in any number of free pdf downloads, as myth is out of copyright. Mozart's uncensored letters have been published in an academic two volume edition. Havelock Ellis' comment is in his essay "Undinism," also an easy pdf download from many sources. The other Ellis story posted by yellowet comes from a rather smarmy paperback about the sex lives of the rich and famous. I think it was written by the late Irving Wallace, but I'm not sure. For Sennett and Mabel, see "Mabel: Hollywood's First I Don't Care Girl," by Betty Fussell. The works of James Joyce can be downloaded for free anywhere; he is one of the world's most famous writers. The bobby soxer wettings come from a personal conversation with my mother, as noted, though I don't remember where I originally heard about it. The quote about Beatles concerts... Is there really anyone who has never heard that quote before?

Which pages or chapters are these in?

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On 5/29/2020 at 11:48 AM, dirtyoldman said:

In part of the Irish mythological cycle of Ulster, some likely lads create a contest to judge who is the best woman in Ireland. The contestants each stand on a mound of snow and pee. Whoever liquefies the greatest amount of snow is declared the best woman in Ireland.

This could be inspiration for a great fantasy fic!

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I can confirm the last one about 1960s Beatles concerts they came to our local ABC cinema to play live in 1963 and early 1964 I new the projectionist for many years after this he would still refer to these concerts as just mad times! Very much particularity the last one as by this time this was when all the young girls just screamed it was deemed the cinema needed a jolly good clean the next day in fact a local contractor was brought in with a steam clean machine to tackle the carpets and seating much piss flowed I think as so many of the girls fainted! Later on, I knew the manager of another big London Cinema where the Osmonds performed live in the 1970s at there height of fame with Donny having been at N01 with Puppy Love that summer. There again it seems the place was awash with pee and in fact, my cousin went to an Osmond concert and admitted her friend who she went with had just totally weed in her knicker when they came on stage it was not until they got out did she realise she had wet even! Great times.

 
Kev.    
Edited by kevy19
Type is in Black but can't seem to change it! (see edit history)
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I'm not at all surprised to hear that Mozart had that sort of kink. He wrote a whole canon about rimming, and tons of letters containing what was essentially scat fetish content. It's kind of amusing to me since my grandma used to always recite his famous rhymed verse about going to bed (and shitting in it apparently)

But I've never heard of Hitler having it, holy hell.

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James Joyce wrote many dirty letters to his wife.

Dude loved his farts and butt stuff

It's a shame none of the letters she wrote back to him seem to exist.

I'll try and dig up the letters he wrote though... and I found them!

https://adoxoblog.wordpress.com/2011/02/25/fμckbird-and-jim-james-joyces-letters-to-nora-barnacle/

 

 

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17 hours ago, FilthyPhoenix said:

I may be wrong as I don't feel obligated to go researching the sexual history of Adolf Hitler, but I'm about 90% certain that anything about him having a piss/shit fetish was just a rumor to make him sound even more insane.

I heard he was afraid of sex, so yeah, lots of conflicting information.

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I found a version of the Irish peeing contest here:

https://sejh.pagesperso-orange.fr/keltia/version-en/derbforg_en.html

There's also an analysis here on page 24, if you're interested, with a section on the peeing, plus the peeing goddess myths: https://uu.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:213892/FULLTEXT01.pdf

Here's the excerpt, spoiler tags 'cause it's a long one:

 

Further possible sexual connotations can be found in the episode where the women have a urination contest, won by Derbforgaill. This episode is important for the tale in that the contest triggers off a chain of violence and deaths, beginning with the mutilation of Derbforgaill and the death of Lugaid upon beholding her, ending with Cú Chulainn’s massacre of the 150 queens responsible for Derbforgaill’s disfigurement and subsequent death. In AD the urination-contest is clearly used as a means of determining the status of the women: In ben ó ría triit is í as fherr ergaire uainn. “The woman from whom it will reach through, it is she that is the best match of us” (AD ll. 22–23). In LL the word used is congaib, whereas D and H have ergaire. Congaib is translated by Marstrander as “to keep”, though Bowen (1975: 27), would rather derive this word from a noun, related to the same verb but having the meaning of “gathering, host” and also “equipment”. See DIL (s.v. congab 438: 7), which gives an example of emasculation involving this word and further gives this line from AD as an example following this, thus in the meaning of the word as “equipment” (s.v. congab 438: 41–43). This is then qualified with the remark “in sensu obscoeno erghaire” (s.v. congab 438: 43–44).87 Bowen refers to congaib as having a sexual meaning, concluding that the meaning of the sentence would rather be “she has the best sexual equipment of us all”, and that the sexual connotations of copious urination are thus established.88 The word ergaire is found in the tale Scéla Conchobair Maic Nessa (Stokes 1910: 18), in a scene describing the size of Fergus’s penis, and due to this the number of women it took to “curb” him. Stokes (1910: 35) describes the meaning in this use as obscure, but adds “in sensu obsceno?” as a note to the text (1910: 27). This word seems to be the verbal noun of the verb ar-gair “forbids, hinders, prevents” though the meaning also includes “being a match for”. Bowen infers from the context and the translation of ergaire as “curb” that the meaning is clearly sexual. I have no major objection to Bowen’s conclusions as to the meaning of these two words, or their sexual connotations. Even so, I would like to caution that the meanings of these two words are obscure, and that very little text material is found in which a clear sexual meaning of these words can be inferred, apart from the examples given above. 86 Text from LL. The tradition of the cutting out of Furbaide is found in several sources, for a discussion of this motif in all its sources, see Wong (1996: 233–241). 87 obscoeno [sic!] 88 The Welsh cognate gafael “grab” does not seem to have any sexual connotation, but cydio, usually “take hold”, does (Geriadur Prifysgol Cymru s.v. gafael, cydio). 25 In l. 22 a reference to úan “foam” (DIL s.v. úan 27: 39) may possibly be found: Tabram ar mún isin coirthe dús cia as sia regas ind. In ben ó ría triit is í as fherr ergaire uainn “Let us make our urine into the pillar to ascertain who will make it go into it the furthest. The woman from whom it will reach through, it is she that is the best match of us”. The reading of D, uainn and H, uain, mean “from us”, the reading úan of LL could be interpreted as the same, although another interpretation is possible, as a word meaning “foam froth”. This word is often found in the meaning of the froth of a wave and froth on ale, which could here possibly refer to the froth of the urine. I have chosen the reading of D and H in this line, to go with ergaire on account of the probability that ergaire is here the lectio difficilior (see text note to ll. 22–23). However, if the reading of LL is chosen, it may imply a sense “The woman from whom it will reach through, it is she that is the best carrier of foam”. This foam may be the foam of the urine or indeed a reference to sperm, thus implying that the woman who would be able to urinate all the way to the ground would be the best to accommodate a man’s sperm, and thus be the most desirable woman of all. This is rather speculative, although in light of the sexual content of this tale, not impossible. The theme of urinating women is rare in Irish literature.89 Of the few other references that I have found is the one from TBC Rec. II where Medb’s profound urination and menstruation is described.90 And sain geibis Medb scíath díten dar éis fer nHérend.91 Andsain faítte Medb in Dond Cúalnge co coíca dá shamascaib imbe & ochtor dá hechlachaib leiss timchell co Crúachain. Gipé reshossed, gipé né rossed, go rossed in Dond Cúalnge feib ra gell-si. Is and drecgais a fúal fola for Meidb [7 itbert: “Geib, a Fherguis,” bar Medb]“scíathdíten dar éis fer nhÉrend92 goro shíblur-sa m’fhúal úaim. “Dar ar cubus,” ar Fergus “is olc in tráth 7 ní cóir a dénam.” “Gid ed ní étaim-sea chena,” bar Medb, “dáig nída beó-sa meni shíblur-sa m’fhúal-sa úaim.” Tánic Fergus 7 gebid scíath díten dar éis fer nhÉrend93. Siblais Medb s fúal úathi co nderna trí tulchlassa móra de co taille munter in cach thurchlaiss. Conid Fúal Medba at berar friss. “Then Medb covered the retreat of the men of Ireland and she sent the Donn Cúailnge around to Crúachu together with fifty of his heifers and eight of Medb´s messengers, so that whoever might reach Crúachu or whoever might not, at least the Donn Cúailnge would arrive there as she had promised. Then her issue of blood came upon her (and she said: “O Fergus, cover) the retreat of the men of Ireland that I may pass my water”. “By my conscience” says Fergus “It is ill-timed and it is not right to do so.” “Yet I cannot but do so” said Medb, “for I shall not live unless I do”. Fergus came then and covered the retreat of the men of Ireland. Medb passed her water and it made three great trenches in each of which a household can fit. Hence the place is called Fúal Medba” (TBC Rec. II: ll. 2820–2832, O’ Rahilly 1967: 269). There is another episode in TBC Rec. I where Medb is urinating inside her tent: Is and dorala Medb ic scriblad a fúail for urlár in pupaill. “In cotlad do Ailill innosa?” ar Medb. “Nad ed ámh,” ar Ailill. “In cluinedo c[h]liamain núa ac celebrad duit?” “An ed dogní-som ón?” ar Ailill. “Is ed écin,” for Medb. “Acht luigim-sa a luigend mo t[h]úath ná tic arna cosaib cétna chucaib-si in fer dogní in celebrad út.” “Medb was urinating on the floor of the tent. “Is Ailill asleep now?” asked Medb. “No indeed,” said Ailill. “Do you hear your new son-in-law bidding you farewell?” “Is that what he is doing?” asked Ailill. “It is indeed,” said Medb. “But I swear my people’s oath that he who is so bidding you farewell will not return to you on his own feet” (TBC Rec. I: ll. 2866–2872, O’Rahilly 1976: 202). 89 Apart from the women in AD and Medb in TBC, there are some references to men urinating. This is found in the Fer Diadepisode of TBC Rec. I (O’ Rahilly 1976: 202, ll. 2860–2871), as well as in the short tale Conall Corc and the Corco Luigdhe (Ed. Meyer 1910b: 57–63, transl. Hull 1947: 937–950). The latter tale is interesting as it involves the urination of blood, a motif similar to the episode concerning Medb’s urination and menstruation discussed above. In FB (Henderson 1899 § 20) is found a burlesque account of urination, although the urination here is only implied, and the main focus is on the competition of the women as they are trying to enter the house first. In addition, the foundation legends of two lakes, Lough Ree and Lough Neagh involve the copious urination of horses. See De Vries (2006) as well as the Prose Dindshenchas and the Metrical Dindshenchas for Loch Echach (Gwynn 1924: 62–68, Stokes 1894: 481–483) and Loch Rib (Gwynn 1913: 450–451, Stokes 1895a: 150–153, see also Stokes 1893: 474–475). 90 This episode is discussed by Bowen (1975: 33) where he also discusses a scene in the late tale Táin Bó Flidaise II as also involving urination, cf. Mackinnon (1907–1908: 208). The episode is also discussed by Dooley (1994: 131–133) and Edel (2006: 84–85). 91 The source has a punctum delens on the n. 92 The source has a punctum delens on the n. 93 The source has a punctum delens on the n. 26 This episode is not as humiliating for Medb, as the previously discussed one, and it does not involve her menstruating. The word play on fúal “urine” and fola “blood” is therefore not present. One can look at the motif of urination in several ways. The urination-contest in AD has been discussed by Bowen, Dooley and Bitel, all of whom agree that this scene involves clear sexual implications. As discussed above, Bowen (1975: 28) discusses the variant readings on the words ergaire and congaib, interpreting them as having sexual connotations. He further discusses the measuring of a woman’s sexual power by the capacity of her inner space, concluding that the bladder serves as an analogue for the vagina and uterus, as a female counterpart of the male potency myth, likewise concerned with size. In this he also interprets the episode as having mythological connotations (1975: 28). According to Bitel (1992: 188), early medieval theories about women’s bodies clearly indicate that very little distinction was made between the bladder, the uterus and the vagina. She claims that urination carries sexual connotations in many cultures, and further infers that even though the prowess of the urination would have been considered as impressive, the abundance would also have been threatening, both to the women and to the men of early Ireland. Bitel refers to Bowen’s article, and further comments that a woman who can control urination clearly has well-developed vaginal muscles, and gives Derbforgaill as an example. The most extensive discussion of the urination-competition in AD is found in Dooley (1994). Dooley’s treatment of the urination contest in AD is found in conjunction with a discussion of gender play in early Irish literature. Her discussion refers to the following passage in AD: Laa n-and didiu i nderiud gemrid, snectha mór and. Do-gníat ind fir corthe mór dint shnechtu. Lotar na mná forna corthe. Ba hé a tuscurnud. “Tabram ar mún isin coirthe dús cia as sia regas ind. In ben ó ría triit is í as fherr ergaire uainn”. “One day then, at the end of winter, there was heavy snow. The men make a big pillar from the snow. The women went on the pillars. This was their device. “Let us make our urine into the pillar to ascertain who will make it go into it the furthest. The woman from whom it will reach through, it is she that is the best match of us” ” (AD ll. 20–23). Dooley interprets the urination contest in the following way: “One might begin then with the proposition that the underlying game is one of male contestation– it is after all the men who first make the pillar and the women only play when the men have grown tired of the novelty” (1984: 132). This is followed by the statement: “It is at least possible that one might interpret this in the most obvious way as a boys’ pissing competition. If this is so, then the imitation game of the women makes more sense here. It is a case of women who will be boys and the possibility suggests itself that for Irish cultural discourse, gender itself can be viewed as a cultural possession which is available for manipulation in a number of ludic, even subversive and contestatory ways” (1994: 132). Dooley’s suggestion that the men had a pissing competition seems to be based on a variant reading found in the two later manuscript of AD, D and H, but not in the earliest, LL. As will be discussed in chapter 2, D and H are so close that I am presuming a common ancestor to these two manuscripts. They are problematic however, inasmuch as even though they both have evidence of later language, they also contain quite a number of readings that seem to be better, and sometimes earlier, than LL (see 2.3.3.2). Some of the readings shared between D and H but not with LL, are further elaborations of the text, which frequently consist of clarification of a verbal action (see 2.3.3.2). The variant reading that is used by Dooley to explain that the men have had a urination competition is of this kind and consists of the phrase iar tain na bfer “after the men”.94 94 Reading from D, the reading from H is: dar eisi na bfer. The reading is found in D and H after the first full sentence of l. 21 in the present edition, see text note to ll. 20–21. 27 Thus in D and H it is stated that the women went up on the pillar after the men. That is all that we are told. The text does not state what the men were doing up there, whether or not they went down again, or if they are still up there while the women’s urination competition takes place. We are simply not told. From the assumption that the men had a competition, Dooley suggests that the women’s competition is a mimicry of this, and even further that it was only played out after the men tired of the game. From this then follows the suggestion that gender is a cultural possession that is available for manipulation. This chain of assumptions is then explored even further by the mentioning of the idea, following Laquer,95 that: “Early medieval societies had a one-body idea of sexuality; thus that the close mimicry of men's game here by women is enable by the concept of the unity of all bodily fluids and the homology between sexual parts. The violent rejection by the other women of Derbforgaill, the woman who can melt snow like a man, ultimately rests as much on the heat as the amount of urine. Thus galenic humour theories of heat as the prerogative of male bodies and moisture of women are confounded; Derbforgaill is dangerous, both as the woman from outside the group and also as the woman with the subversive body who might be capable of both giving and experiencing pleasures in sex in ways that usurp a long-standing male prerogative and disturb the standard of gender by which women themselves collectively orient their gender identity” (1994: 132–133). That a presumed concept of all bodily fluids would enable the mimicry of men’s games is still based on the presumption that the men had a competition that could be imitated in the first place. This is certainly a possible conjecture, but again it needs to be pointed out that this is an interpretation, and that nowhere in the text is it stated that such a competition took place. Furthermore, the women’s violent reaction of Derbforgaill’s winning the competition is in Dooley explained as the result as much of the heat as the amount of the urine. However, all the text tells us about the urine is the statement that the women went up on the pillar to see from whom it would reach the furthest, and that when Derbforgaill enters the competition the urine slashed from her to the ground. Heat is not at all mentioned in the text, thus both this and the following statement that male heat and female moisture would have been confounded is stated without any foundation in the text. The fact that the urine from anyone’s body, be it female or male, will melt snow, cannot have been a surprise to anyone in early Ireland. There is further nothing whatsoever in the text that states that the heat of the urine is the reason for the women’s wrath. This whole chain of assumptions seems to be based on a variant reading in the two later manuscripts of this tale, which I suggest is not original, and which only provides the information that the women went up on the pillar after the men.

Edited by PPP (see edit history)
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18 hours ago, FilthyPhoenix said:

I may be wrong as I don't feel obligated to go researching the sexual history of Adolf Hitler, but I'm about 90% certain that anything about him having a piss/shit fetish was just a rumor to make him sound even more insane.

That is completely plausible.  I'm always skeptical when hearing about famous people. 

 

I heard Hitler was the king of all meth heads.

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  • 1 month later...
From Havelock Ellis, Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Vol.7 (Florrie)

At the time, however, when the period of adolescence came 
to an end, when Florrie was just about twenty-one, an in- 
cident occurred which re-awakened her interest in urination on 
a new side. It may seem a trivial incident, but in Florrie's 
memory it stands out as “a feat of great audacity,'' and it has 
so much significance in her psycho-sexual development that it 
may be well to narrate it exactly in her own words: ‘‘We were 
living in the residential part of a large English town and I was 
paying calls. At the last house I had stayed half an hour and 
as I then experienccd a great need I determined on quitting 
the drawing room and being shown out to ask the maid if I 
might retire. This was all settled nicely in my mind, but it 
never came off. When I rose to go, my hostess expressed a 
wish that I should see her conservatory, and we all went into 
the garden accompanied by the son of the house. It followed 
naturally that I had to make my exit from the garden directly 
into the road. By this time further delay had made matters 
worse. I felt that I could not wait any longer. There were no 
shops near, only houses, and I could not find any sheltered spot. 
I at once realized how utterly impossible it would be to squat 
down, so I determined to make the attempt standing, though I
felt very nervous and doubtful as to my probable success. 

There was no rain to help matters, and the pavement was white 
and dry. I was afraid to stand in the gutter for fear of attract- 
ing attention, but I stood on the extreme edge of the curb and 
looked down the road as though I was expecting somebody. 
No one was in sight, and I determined to be as quick as pos- 
sible, but to my mortification it wouldn’t come. I suppose I 
had put off too long. At last, after waiting what seemed to me 
a tremendous time (although probably only a few seconds!), I 
felt it beginning to come. For fear of detection I had refrained 
from standing with my legs a little apart, and the result was 
that a great deal went into my drawers and soaked them straight 
off. Afterwards, the stream penetrated, and came with terrific 
force on the pavement, and terrible were my feelings when I 
saw it meandering from under my skirt and running down the 
pavement instead of into the gutter. To help matters I placed 
one foot in the road and was covered with confusion when I 
saw three persons approaching. I remember shutting my eyes, 
as though if I did not see them they would not see me! I was 
rooted to the spot, I felt detection was certain if I moved, and 
I was sure as they passed that they must have heard the sound, 
and seen the stream. As soon as they had gone I moved on 
and came to another turning. Here I found a house for sale, 
and as the gate was open into the garden it immediately oc- 
curred to me that I had by no means finished, and I hid near a 
bush, whilst apparently engaged in surveying the house. I was 
now on grass and felt fairly secure. I was standing up, and for 
the first time realized that it was a nice sensation, and a delight 
to do it like this. Several persons passed, but that rather added 
to the charm, since I was secure. A first experience is not for- 
gotten. After that, and finding that it was quite possible to 
achieve this feat without much difficulty, I had other experi- 
ences." 

...............................................................................................................

‘T remember, even as a child (five or six) that it gave me 
a kind of shock when I did it standing. It seemed so horribly 
audacious and bold. This idea was confused in my childish 
mind with the other idea, — that I was doing something wrong, 
— which was the case, since I did it right off without waiting 
for usual preliminaries, thus wetting myself. But there was 
always also a feeling at the back of my mind that it was wrong 
in itself, just as crawling on all fours was wrong, although the 
delight of children. Children confuse the conventional with 
the right, just as grown-up persons often do. As I grew older 
I could not overcome this idea. I remember at the age of fifteen 
having occasion to do it standing one night in the dark out of 
doors. I simply couldn’t wait any longer, but not seeing any- 
one about I thought I might venture. I dared not squat down, 
and felt sure it could not be done standing; I had faint recol- 
lections of my childish exploits in that direction, but thought 
vaguely that children were different. (No one had ever told 
me of women doing it this way, nor had I ever seen it done.) 
I wondered how the experiment would act, or if it would act at 
all ! I remembered standing in the gutter and waiting, hoping no 
one would pass. I was afraid they would guess my purpose, 
especially as I was obliged to stand with my legs somewhat 
apart for fear of splashing my clothes. I thought it would never 
come, and when it did I shall never forget my abashed feelings. 
I would have stopped it if I could, but when it once came it 
would not cease. In my alarmed state of imagination it seemed 
to make an appalling noise which I felt sure could not fail to 
attract attention if anyone passed. Not only was I fearfully 
afraid that the rustling sound would attract attention, but from 
under my clothes there emerged a stream which ran rapidly 
along the gutter, betraying me ! I splashed my stockings in my 
haste, and tore away just in time as I saw a man coming along, 
feeling very red and abashed, and wishing that I had found 
some dark comer where I could have squatted successfully. In 
trying to analyze my sensations I think the most prominent 
lay in the shame that came from standing, and the consequently 
greater distance the stream had to descend. It seemed to make 
the affair important and conspicuous, even though clothing hid 
it. In the ordinary attitude there is a kind of privacy. As a 
small child, too, the stream had not far to go ; but at the age of 
fifteen I was tall and it seemed to give one a glow of shame 
to think of this stream falling unchecked such a distance. (I 
am sure that the ladies who fled in horror from the urinette 
thought it most indecent for a woman to stride across an earth- 
enware boat on the ground, a leg on each side, and standing 
there to pull up her clothes and do a stream which descended 
unabashed all that way.) 
Edited by farseladosso (see edit history)
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On 5/29/2020 at 10:43 PM, dirtyoldman said:

I don't have links because I am not an Internet guy and I found these in books rather than online. For the Irish mythological sources, try "The Cattle Raid of Cooley" for goddesses who pee rivers, and "The Death of Derbforgaill" for the peeing contest. Most of these can easily be found in any number of free pdf downloads, as myth is out of copyright. Mozart's uncensored letters have been published in an academic two volume edition. Havelock Ellis' comment is in his essay "Undinism," also an easy pdf download from many sources. The other Ellis story posted by yellowet comes from a rather smarmy paperback about the sex lives of the rich and famous. I think it was written by the late Irving Wallace, but I'm not sure. For Sennett and Mabel, see "Mabel: Hollywood's First I Don't Care Girl," by Betty Fussell. The works of James Joyce can be downloaded for free anywhere; he is one of the world's most famous writers. The bobby soxer wettings come from a personal conversation with my mother, as noted, though I don't remember where I originally heard about it. The quote about Beatles concerts... Is there really anyone who has never heard that quote before?

I think they were asking for these citations in APA 😉  Thanks for sharing!

 

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5 hours ago, farseladosso said:
From Havelock Ellis, Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Vol.7 (Florrie)

At the time, however, when the period of adolescence came 
to an end, when Florrie was just about twenty-one, an in- 
cident occurred which re-awakened her interest in urination on 
a new side. It may seem a trivial incident, but in Florrie's 
memory it stands out as “a feat of great audacity,'' and it has 
so much significance in her psycho-sexual development that it 
may be well to narrate it exactly in her own words: ‘‘We were 
living in the residential part of a large English town and I was 
paying calls. At the last house I had stayed half an hour and 
as I then experienccd a great need I determined on quitting 
the drawing room and being shown out to ask the maid if I 
might retire. This was all settled nicely in my mind, but it 
never came off. When I rose to go, my hostess expressed a 
wish that I should see her conservatory, and we all went into 
the garden accompanied by the son of the house. It followed 
naturally that I had to make my exit from the garden directly 
into the road. By this time further delay had made matters 
worse. I felt that I could not wait any longer. There were no 
shops near, only houses, and I could not find any sheltered spot. 
I at once realized how utterly impossible it would be to squat 
down, so I determined to make the attempt standing, though I
felt very nervous and doubtful as to my probable success. 

There was no rain to help matters, and the pavement was white 
and dry. I was afraid to stand in the gutter for fear of attract- 
ing attention, but I stood on the extreme edge of the curb and 
looked down the road as though I was expecting somebody. 
No one was in sight, and I determined to be as quick as pos- 
sible, but to my mortification it wouldn’t come. I suppose I 
had put off too long. At last, after waiting what seemed to me 
a tremendous time (although probably only a few seconds!), I 
felt it beginning to come. For fear of detection I had refrained 
from standing with my legs a little apart, and the result was 
that a great deal went into my drawers and soaked them straight 
off. Afterwards, the stream penetrated, and came with terrific 
force on the pavement, and terrible were my feelings when I 
saw it meandering from under my skirt and running down the 
pavement instead of into the gutter. To help matters I placed 
one foot in the road and was covered with confusion when I 
saw three persons approaching. I remember shutting my eyes, 
as though if I did not see them they would not see me! I was 
rooted to the spot, I felt detection was certain if I moved, and 
I was sure as they passed that they must have heard the sound, 
and seen the stream. As soon as they had gone I moved on 
and came to another turning. Here I found a house for sale, 
and as the gate was open into the garden it immediately oc- 
curred to me that I had by no means finished, and I hid near a 
bush, whilst apparently engaged in surveying the house. I was 
now on grass and felt fairly secure. I was standing up, and for 
the first time realized that it was a nice sensation, and a delight 
to do it like this. Several persons passed, but that rather added 
to the charm, since I was secure. A first experience is not for- 
gotten. After that, and finding that it was quite possible to 
achieve this feat without much difficulty, I had other experi- 
ences." 

...............................................................................................................

‘T remember, even as a child (five or six) that it gave me 
a kind of shock when I did it standing. It seemed so horribly 
audacious and bold. This idea was confused in my childish 
mind with the other idea, — that I was doing something wrong, 
— which was the case, since I did it right off without waiting 
for usual preliminaries, thus wetting myself. But there was 
always also a feeling at the back of my mind that it was wrong 
in itself, just as crawling on all fours was wrong, although the 
delight of children. Children confuse the conventional with 
the right, just as grown-up persons often do. As I grew older 
I could not overcome this idea. I remember at the age of fifteen 
having occasion to do it standing one night in the dark out of 
doors. I simply couldn’t wait any longer, but not seeing any- 
one about I thought I might venture. I dared not squat down, 
and felt sure it could not be done standing; I had faint recol- 
lections of my childish exploits in that direction, but thought 
vaguely that children were different. (No one had ever told 
me of women doing it this way, nor had I ever seen it done.) 
I wondered how the experiment would act, or if it would act at 
all ! I remembered standing in the gutter and waiting, hoping no 
one would pass. I was afraid they would guess my purpose, 
especially as I was obliged to stand with my legs somewhat 
apart for fear of splashing my clothes. I thought it would never 
come, and when it did I shall never forget my abashed feelings. 
I would have stopped it if I could, but when it once came it 
would not cease. In my alarmed state of imagination it seemed 
to make an appalling noise which I felt sure could not fail to 
attract attention if anyone passed. Not only was I fearfully 
afraid that the rustling sound would attract attention, but from 
under my clothes there emerged a stream which ran rapidly 
along the gutter, betraying me ! I splashed my stockings in my 
haste, and tore away just in time as I saw a man coming along, 
feeling very red and abashed, and wishing that I had found 
some dark comer where I could have squatted successfully. In 
trying to analyze my sensations I think the most prominent 
lay in the shame that came from standing, and the consequently 
greater distance the stream had to descend. It seemed to make 
the affair important and conspicuous, even though clothing hid 
it. In the ordinary attitude there is a kind of privacy. As a 
small child, too, the stream had not far to go ; but at the age of 
fifteen I was tall and it seemed to give one a glow of shame 
to think of this stream falling unchecked such a distance. (I 
am sure that the ladies who fled in horror from the urinette 
thought it most indecent for a woman to stride across an earth- 
enware boat on the ground, a leg on each side, and standing 
there to pull up her clothes and do a stream which descended 
unabashed all that way.) 

Super hot!

 

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13 hours ago, rachelkirwan said:

Super hot!

Oh yes, Havelock Ellis: I still remember how I had discovered his works by chance in the library of the insitute where I worked on my doctorate. Lots of stories of women who wet themselves in a scientific book! I often went to the library to read them when I needed a break from my studies.  😊

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4 hours ago, kalle2020 said:

Oh yes, Havelock Ellis: I still remember how I had discovered his works by chance in the library of the insitute where I worked on my doctorate. Lots of stories of women who wet themselves in a scientific book! I often went to the library to read them when I needed a break from my studies.  😊

Same here.

I think Havelock was one of us. (Somewhere I read that he had "a morbid interest in urination".) In those days his papers on pee-related sexuality were scandalous, even rejected by publishers. I am not sure about the extent of progress in this respect which has since been made...

Hate has not only become a common term with respect to political speech but also rules with respect to certain forms of sexuality and related pornography. We all know  an example of such a form.

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  • 5 months later...
On 6/1/2020 at 4:43 AM, FilthyPhoenix said:

I may be wrong as I don't feel obligated to go researching the sexual history of Adolf Hitler, but I'm about 90% certain that anything about him having a piss/shit fetish was just a rumor to make him sound even more insane.

Exactly! Kind of like the rumour that Idi Amin was a cannibal. It can not to be trusted too much.

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