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Diaper use in real life


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Apologies if this question has been asked before. I did a search, but there were too many diaper-related themes to check.

Does anyone know of scenarios in everyday life where people would wear diapers? I’m not talking about babies or infirm/elderly people, but people with normal bladder/bowel control in situations where there is no access to a toilet.

The two that I know of are:

  • astronauts in spacesuits
  • people who do deep sea scuba diving

Does anyone know of other examples? For example, what about people who are doing solo ocean sailing? Presumably, they have to be prepared for occasions when bad conditions make it impossible to leave the tiller?

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I'm thinking of wearing a diaper on a long car trip.  As I have gotten older I am sensitive to sodium in my diet and some days I have to pee quite frequently.  Sometimes the rest areas aren't present when you need one.  I have had some close calls and since I am male I have stopped beside the road, but there are times when a diaper would have been nice.

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I've heard a few people here wear diapers to the movie theater to avoid having to take a bathroom break in the middle of the movie and no risk of peeing all over the seats. (I'd do it myself if I thought I could get away with buying some diapers, and knew where to find them in my size)

Edited by The Dark Wolf (see edit history)
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In college two-hour finals.  Also SAT exams.  Long trips in cars, kayaks or private aircraft.  Cross-country skiing.  Busing on cross-county buses--especially when the trip requires two 90 minute rides with no restroom at the transfer point.

Plus urologists consider bladders down to 300 mL normal.  In people so equipped a large soda exceeds bladder capacity.

Wet-suit divers in our cold shallows pee their wet suits for warmth (no diaper).

I buy diapers at the local drug store.  When a 20 or 30-something buys diapers, people assume it's for grandpa or one of the above reasons.

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There's a short docuseries about F-18 pilot training in Canada called Jetstream. In one of the episodes, they take the students on a cross country flight from Cold Lake to LA. In it, they talk about a lack of bathrooms at 30,000' and one of the students, a female, reveals she will wear depends to make the trip. She even goes so far as to show the camera she already has a pack ready to go in the squadron. 

Now, I have it on good authority that it is especially UN-common for fighter pilots to choose an adult diaper over the other methods available to them, but it's still fun to see a young lady openly choosing the diapered route. I suppose it could have been a joke or a dare as well, but we'll never know. 

Years ago, this whole series was available on YouTube. A quick search reveals only the first two episodes still reside there. Unfortunately I think the episode in question was number 4. Regardless, it's a cool little series on its own. Just do a search for jetstream f-18 canada. 

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  • 7 months later...
On 12/30/2019 at 9:21 PM, Flyboy said:

There's a short docuseries about F-18 pilot training in Canada called Jetstream. In one of the episodes, they take the students on a cross country flight from Cold Lake to LA. In it, they talk about a lack of bathrooms at 30,000' and one of the students, a female, reveals she will wear depends to make the trip. She even goes so far as to show the camera she already has a pack ready to go in the squadron. 

Now, I have it on good authority that it is especially UN-common for fighter pilots to choose an adult diaper over the other methods available to them, but it's still fun to see a young lady openly choosing the diapered route. I suppose it could have been a joke or a dare as well, but we'll never know. 

Years ago, this whole series was available on YouTube. A quick search reveals only the first two episodes still reside there. Unfortunately I think the episode in question was number 4. Regardless, it's a cool little series on its own. Just do a search for jetstream f-18 canada. 

I remember this episode! My family had a good laugh when she held up the depends and smiled

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In the past I've worn when going out for a blast on the motorbike wearing one-piece leathers and not planning to stop for several hours but having drunk a modest amount (of soft drink) to stay hydrated if it gets unexpectedly hot.  I've even worn latex tights in case of overflow (as the sitting position on a sports bike isn't ideal for maximum nappy capacity) and on one occasion a full latex catsuit under the leathers.

In the current situation I'm wearing when I go to the pub as I'm only risking sitting outside and in any case avoiding public toilets.   If I do have to start making site visits again in the near future I shall be wearing for those.

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Glider pilots use diapers sometimes when they plan to go on long flights. Women don't have much of an option, they have to use diapers or hold it. There are some that use diapers, I know that for a fact. Men usually prefer to use bags with SAP inside, which is basically the same stuff which is in diapers.

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Precision about the diving, diapers are used in some cases when using dry suits (as the name suggests, you are dry in there). It is used in cold water diving (not necessarily deep). For men, there is a thing called a Pee-valve, that allows you to do your business without ending in troubles. When I had to use a dry suit (in Antarctica), I was clearly told by an experienced diver "you don't want to make extra holes in a dry suit" (as it is just one more potential source of troubles) and I happily took this suggestion as a reason to wear diapers during the dives without over hiding (and it was quite helpful to justify discarding wet overnight diapers too). I heard of a similar pee valve for women, but I am not sure how it works and it is clearly less well established, so ladies mostly wear diapers or hold on when diving in dry suits (it also depends on the time people plan to spend in the suit).

Related to that, I had an opportunity to do a submarine dive, they do have "portable toilets" (a bag for pee, a box for poop), but again a friend who was more experienced also recommended diapers as "you maybe don't want to do your business right in front of the other persons" (you are 3 persons in a sphere of about 2.5 m diameter for several hours). There again, I happily followed this recommendation.

As mentioned in a previous post, long exams can be a reason to wear diapers and it is mainly during the exams sessions that I used to see diapers in the toilet trash at the university (that were not mine).

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On 8/16/2020 at 7:59 AM, OkiF said:

Related to that, I had an opportunity to do a submarine dive, they do have "portable toilets" (a bag for pee, a box for poop), but again a friend who was more experienced also recommended diapers as "you maybe don't want to do your business right in front of the other persons" (you are 3 persons in a sphere of about 2.5 m diameter for several hours).

This would be fun to read about, both the diaper use and the awkward close-quarters toilet use!

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On 12/29/2019 at 10:43 PM, d418 said:

 I’m not talking about babies or infirm/elderly people, but people with normal bladder/bowel control

 

This is a little way off your topic but... 

 Incontinence isn't a 'old people' thing: the prevalence among healthy women in their twenties is surprisingly high. 

About one in eight of them would be diagnosed as incontinent, whether mildly, moderately, or severely. 

About 1 in 40 are in the  'moderate' category. 

Seven in every thousand women in their twenties have 'severe' incontinence, or worse: a majority of those women genuinely expect to make it to the toilet to pee, but they wear 24/7 because 'severe' means uncontrolled voiding more than one or twice a week; a little less than half of them have 'Major Incontinence', which means no voluntary control and no expectation whatsoever that they will use the bathroom to piss, other than by catheterisation. 

 

Your next question is: what's 'mild' and 'moderate'? 

The answers are not well-defined: most of 'mild' incontinence is leakage - drops and spurts, but happening often enough that a woman regards it as a problem.

If it was regular total losses, she wouldn't be classed as 'mild' - but they are significantly more likely to lose it in an "Oh no she's wet herself!",  puddle and all, than the majority of young women: they,  the majority, have a baseline risk of 2- or 3% of wetting themselves like that in any given year.

At the upper boundary of 'normal' - the very mild end of being medically diagnosed 'mildly incontinent' - the risk is about 10 to 20 percent per year... 

Warning: when you do the research, you'll see these estimates vary a lot, because the quality of the statistics is abysmal. 

...Most of those one-in-eight young women will not seek advice and none of the 'mildly' are wearing full-coverage diapers; but some of those mildly-incontinent women are wearing a small pad to catch the little leakages during the day, sometimes being careful what they drink, and maybe making clothing choices that are dark to hide it and  don't cling to their hips. 

But many of them do choose hot shorts, figure-hugging jeans and light bikinis on the beach: they are  women in their twenties , young and free. 

Stereotypes of 'the incontinent' do not apply until we get to women who are middle-aged, and often not even then. 

Moving further in from 'very mild', still among healthy women in their twenties, the ones who have a bit of 'urge' incontinence are *maybe* wearing a fully-fitted diaper for long journeys, because they've wet themselves completely, once or more in the last 12 months, and maybe they leak quite a bit.

But  maybe they don't leak at all:  there are 2 or 3 in every hundred healthy women in their 20's, who have a mild incontinence that's 'urge' incontinence - voiding her bladder, not just leaking - that they just get along with, rarely Wearing and mostly never seeking help. 

If it's urge incontinence, and they lose it four times a year or more , then they are moving into the category of 'moderate' incontinence. 

(Definitions vary from study to study, but they get more precise and better-researched as we move further from 'mild')

Surprisingly, a lot of these moderately incontinent women don't wear diapers or even a pad - at least, not every day, because The Big Wetting Accident is still an infrequent occurrence - and they live the lives of happy and healthy young women, give or take a bit of care and occasionally some anxiety. 

Are they attractive? Hard not to be, at that age, though some have given up. 

There is a correlation between being overweight, and having poor bladder control; and, as we get further into 'moderate' towards 'severe', self-esteem and confidence become an issue, too. 

But... They are still healthy (apart from their bladder problem) and anything between half and a quarter of them will be slim, or a pleasingly feminine hourglass shape, and damned attractive.

Incontinence isn't all about being overweight: skinny women piss their panties too. 

The lady blogging as  'ItsBellaMarie, Bitch'  is in the 'moderate' bracket, getting-on for 'severe', but she is very attractive indeed: something between one and one-and-a-half percent of all women in their twenties are where she is, placing them by looks and by bladder control. 

They will almost certainly Wear for road trips, short- and long-haul flights, long movies, academic and professional exams, and occasions where they know they will be drinking. 

Or not: sometimes they just dress up, doll up, get out for a night on the town, and take the risk. You're only young once and  "To hell with it I'm going anyway" is A Thing. 

But it's normal for them to pad up, or diaper-up, even if it isn't 24/7, or even most of the time: there are occasions wearing a diaper is a normal thing for them to do

And then, of course, there are the 'Majors' and 'Severes' in their twenties, seven in every thousand, for whom Wearing is their normal daily life: it may well be that fewer than half of them - maybe even less - are attractive, and that is saddening because it's very easy when you're young... 

But... Some of them are attractive. 

So in every hundred women in their twenties, most of whom will be pretty and sometimes willing, there are one or two attractive women for whom being diapered is a constant thing, or a normal thing that they do on the occasions when they need to. 

And this is where I get to  my  point being  your  point: two percent is actually a lot, and if you live in a  town that's pretty much a small city - say, eighty thousand people - that means there are ten attractive women you would like to buy a drink and chat to, for whom being diapered is quite normal. 

 

I have no idea how many adult women regularly wear a diaper for fun, or for lazy convenience. 

 

...Finally: what is 'normal'? What is 'Real', the way you mean it? 

Normal women, who aren't incontinent? 

if you could conduct a survey of healthy women in the 18-30 bracket, active in work or in college, and never had a child, you would find that thirty percent of them admit to 'an involuntary loss of urine' in the last thirty days...

But none of the published research tells you how much, how often, and where. 

Nevertheless, I can tell you that the vast majority of all that pee will be in dribbles and spurts and a few lost drops that no-one ever knew about, except for the woman who did it. 

A dozen of those thirty women will be incontinent - mildly, mostly - but the majority of those young women are not incontinent: this minor wetting is normal

Likewise, wetting yourself completely, if you're a healthy young woman with a social life... It's a thing that happens.

Because it's such a rare occurrence, it's a thing that ninety-five percent of women in their twenties will pretend  it's a  'never gonna happen to me'  thing, and are appalled, and often downright bitchy, when it happens to another woman. 

But... No woman is perfectly in control of her bladder: baseline continence for a woman in her twenties is a two or three percent chance of wetting herself, in any given year, going over ten percent when  she's closer to the one-in-eight than to the median.

Do the arithmetic, and it's more than 50-50 likely that a woman in her twenties, who satisfies the medical definition of 'fully continent', will reach the age of thirty never having wet herself as an adult, give or take the little leak or dribble no-one ever knew about and didn't count as 'wet herself'. 

But the other half of that 50-50  leaves three or four normal and typically-continent women, in any random crowd of a hundred women in their twenties, who have wet themselves completely in the last twelve months. 

Betcha they'll be wearing diaper on that road trip, in that long exam, and in that movie with no interval, just like women who know they are moderately incontinent, for a year or two after their accident. 

Three percent's  a lot of twenty-something women  in a city of a million people: two thousand, wearing diapers for that occasional long trip, plus a thousand of the not-so-normal ones, who nevertheless will lead a normal life, living, studying, getting out and enjoying herself, with occasions and situations in which being in a diaper is completely normal. 

If you're in the middle of a large European city, there's one of them within a mile of you, a woman in her twenties wearing a diaper, right now. 

 

Also: look up the statistics for incontinence in women who participate in high-impact sports and distance running.

They are as fit as a woman can possibly be, and there will be about a hundred women in that city of a million for whom pissing in her lycra or her running shorts *without any thought of wearing a diaper* is a frequent and acceptable normality. 

 

Get real, as we say in the Big City. 

Edited by betanumeric
Tidying the typos and cleaning the sentences, for clarity (see edit history)
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On 8/18/2020 at 4:01 PM, betanumeric said:

If you're in the middle of a large European city, there's one of them within a mile of you, a woman in her twenties wearing a diaper, right now. 

That's a nice thought... and how many of those women are happily relieving their bladders in their soft, bulky nappies as I type? 😉

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20 hours ago, nappypants said:

That's a nice thought... and how many of those women are happily relieving their bladders in their soft, bulky nappies as I type? 😉

What, you want the numbers?

Here's what I got:

 

 

There is a 5% chance that one of those women is pissing, in this very second.

If you count out 45 seconds, it is all but certain that a young woman is pissing in her diaper, somewhere within a mile of you, by the time you finish.

That's an interesting thought for you to have, to pass the 45 seconds or so that it'll take you, the next time you go for a piss.

 

 

"Show your working..."

A quick look at Wikipedia gives me the average population density where I live, and I now know that there are about 48,000 people within a mile of me.

About 3000 of them are women in their twenties, at this time of year (yes, I looked up the demographics; if you don't have that, divide-by-fourteen is a pretty good guess in most Western European cities).

 

1.5% of 3000 is 45 young women - I wasn't entirely frank (nor entirely correct) with that 'one of them' within a mile of you.

They are probably quite careful in their fluid intake, but will probably still piss six times a day, during the sixteen hours they are awake (sllghtly smaller bladder, less well-trained i than the average woman, who will typically piss four times a day).

Each piss takes about 45 seconds.

...If she's one of the ones with 'major' incontinence. Which would be about 0.3% of women in their twenties, releasing six involuntary urinations into their diaper every day. 

So: 6 wettings a day, for each of the 9 women who have major incontinence, in our population of 45 diaper-wearers in their 20's.

Moving out to the boundary of the 0.7% 'severely' incontinent, and further out again to moderately-incontinent women who wear 24/7 because they piss once a week, we get a further three-and-a-half wettings every day, spread out among the remaining 36 of them:

  • Severely:  11.5 wettings a day, on average, within a group of a further 12 who are severely incontinent.
  • Moderately: And about one—and-half wettings a day for the rest, who are moderately incontinent but still wearing.

That means that there will be about (9 x 6) + (11 .5)  + (1.5) involuntary urinations per day, from those 45 women: 66 wettings.

So the average diaper-wearing twenty-something spends 66 seconds a day pissing in her diaper.

So, in any given second that you're thinking about it, there's a change of 66/57600 that she - one particular woman - is pissing in that specific second.

That's about a tenth of a percent that she is, and 99.9% that she isn't.

I'm going to be very precise in the next step, even though those numbers are actually very rough estimates, because the next step is very sensitive.

It isn't just one woman in her twenties, in a diaper, within a mile of me: it's 45 of them.

The probability that a specific one of them isn't pissing, right this second, is  0.99885    ( the 99.9% I got, a moment ago)

The probability that *all 45 of them* aren't pissing, right now, is to multiply that 0.998885 forty-five times over:

(0.99885) ^45

Which is about 95%

So there is a 5% chance that one of those women is pissing, in this very second.

And that's where we get to this bit:

If you count out 45 seconds, it is  almost certain that a young woman is pissing in her diaper, somewhere within a mile of you, when you start, or by the time you finish.

Because we're rolling a 95% probability, forty-five times, and that goes down as (0.95) multiplying itself 45 times. 

 

 

Anything else you should think about?

Try working out how many of them are sitting in a wet diaper, right now - if half of them change within ten minutes of wetting themselves, and half of them are wearing an 'all day'.

I do not know how many of the 'severely' incontinent women are actually making an effort to use the toilet: there's got to come a point at which you just don't bother, ever, and there will be times when she says: "Fuck it, I might as well" or "Well, I have to finish what I'm doing, if that means I don't make it to the toilet afterwards, fine".

It could well be that there are the nine women pissing involuntarily, six times a day, and another dozen women who will probably wet themselves once or twice because they were unable to hold it, but also wet themselves once, or twice, or every damn' time , just because it's easier.

I do not know how many of them are enjoying it: I hope that some of them are, but I suspect that it's just a bodily function for the vast majority.

And there *are* attractive women who do enjoy their piss, whether holding it, or doing it, or the thrill of the illicit around it: I just have no idea of how many.

I suspect that the taboos about it mean that it's well below one in a thousand, in the normal, continent and "Of course I'm continent!" population of women in their 20's, who have the diaper kink and piss in them for pleasure: but that's still a fair number - three of them, within a mile of me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by betanumeric
Refined the drop-off curve for expected wetting per day calculations (see edit history)
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A bit of nappy maths, with a few assumptions!

There are around 13.5 million women aged 18-49 in the UK. One survey I found suggests 10% have some form of incontinence. Even if only 1 in 100 of those 10% have very severe incontinence, meaning they are full time in nappies with pretty much no bladder control, that's still 13,500 women.

The average person spends 2 minutes a day urinating... based on that, there would be around 19 younger women uncontrollably wetting their nappies at any given moment!

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On 8/31/2020 at 3:00 PM, nappypants said:

A bit of nappy maths, with a few assumptions!

There are around 13.5 million women aged 18-49 in the UK. One survey I found suggests 10% have some form of incontinence. Even if only 1 in 100 of those 10% have very severe incontinence, meaning they are full time in nappies with pretty much no bladder control, that's still 13,500 women.

 

 

Your math stacks up pretty well, and I can help you by clarifying my own assumptions and warning you about the data quality. 

I looked at the numbers for women in their twenties, as a proxy for 'attractive'; some women in their twenties aren't, but many in their thirties and their forties are. 

It balances out, well enough for me. 

You need more than one survey: the number for incontinence - mild, medium and severe - for women in their twenties in developed countries is 10.5% in some surveys, and 13.5% in others, with the median result around 12.5%.

The data quality is terrible. But, in fairness, the definitions are imprecise at the 'mild' end of incontinence. Look for surveys that have been followed-up (even as small-scale spot-tests and random sampling) by pad-weighing tests, urodynamics, and a continence diary. 

The data gets better, and more easily-available, as we get to the 'severe' category. It's a hard number of 0.7% of women in their twenties, who are otherwise healthy, active in the community, and have never had a child - and 'otherwise healthy' excludes learning difficulties and motor disability, obesity and transient medical conditions like cystitis. 

Severe is well-defined: near-continuous leakage, or involuntary *daytime* voiding twice a week or more. 

There is, a subset of 'severe', at 0.3% in countries with comprehensive healthcare systems  - which means: higher in the USA - referred to as Major Incontinence, which means that they would only use a toilet to pee for diaper changing, emptying a collection bag, or catheterisation. 

 

The vast majority of surveys are all about the authors' prejudices about 'the incontinent', or their sponsors interests (which means: marketing a product, and their marketing executives' prejudices about 'the incontinent'), so they are mostly about the elderly, and about middle-aged mothers. 

Nobody really believes that it's as common as it really is, among young and healthy women, outside a tiny handful of researchers and a very small minority of medical professionals... 

...Who are, regrettably, giving very bad advice to the five percent or so of women who consult them with 'a bladder issue'

The vast majority of women who have wet themselves are entirely unaware that it is quite common to do so, even without being 'incontinent', and that this particular label can be applied to about one in eight of all healthy women in their twenties.

What do I mean by 'quite common?' 

There is no such thing as 'continence', unless you define it as 'a very low, but non-zero, probability that you will wet yourself'. To the best of my knowledge, the probability that a healthy childless woman in her twenties will wet herself goes down from 'regularly incontinent' to about 2% or 3% per year. So most women reach the age of thirty without ever wetting themselves - but over a quarter of their friends *will* have done so. 

 

 

For serious research that asks: "What is actually going on in the general population, at all ages?", you need to look at published and peer-reviewed work sponsored by universal healthcare providers. 

Unfortunately, that kind of prevalence data is *always* locked against us, behind the paywall of a medical journal, despite it being funded by taxpayers in a country with an open healthcare system available to all. 

The exception is the Continus survey, conducted in Norway, Sweden, Finland and Denmark: see if it's available in your country. 

 

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4 hours ago, betanumeric said:

 

Your math stacks up pretty well, and I can help you by clarifying my own assumptions and warning you about the data quality. 

I looked at the numbers for women in their twenties, as a proxy for 'attractive'; some women in their twenties aren't, but many in their thirties and their forties are. 

It balances out, well enough for me. 

You need more than one survey: the number for incontinence - mild, medium and severe - for women in their twenties in developed countries is 10.5% in some surveys, and 13.5% in others, with the median result around 12.5%.

The data quality is terrible. But, in fairness, the definitions are imprecise at the 'mild' end of incontinence. Look for surveys that have been followed-up (even as small-scale spot-tests and random sampling) by pad-weighing tests, urodynamics, and a continence diary. 

The data gets better, and more easily-available, as we get to the 'severe' category. It's a hard number of 0.7% of women in their twenties, who are otherwise healthy, active in the community, and have never had a child - and 'otherwise healthy' excludes learning difficulties and motor disability, obesity and transient medical conditions like cystitis. 

Severe is well-defined: near-continuous leakage, or involuntary *daytime* voiding twice a week or more. 

There is, a subset of 'severe', at 0.3% in countries with comprehensive healthcare systems  - which means: higher in the USA - referred to as Major Incontinence, which means that they would only use a toilet to pee for diaper changing, emptying a collection bag, or catheterisation. 

 

The vast majority of surveys are all about the authors' prejudices about 'the incontinent', or their sponsors interests (which means: marketing a product, and their marketing executives' prejudices about 'the incontinent'), so they are mostly about the elderly, and about middle-aged mothers. 

Nobody really believes that it's as common as it really is, among young and healthy women, outside a tiny handful of researchers and a very small minority of medical professionals... 

...Who are, regrettably, giving very bad advice to the five percent or so of women who consult them with 'a bladder issue'

The vast majority of women who have wet themselves are entirely unaware that it is quite common to do so, even without being 'incontinent', and that this particular label can be applied to about one in eight of all healthy women in their twenties.

What do I mean by 'quite common?' 

There is no such thing as 'continence', unless you define it as 'a very low, but non-zero, probability that you will wet yourself'. To the best of my knowledge, the probability that a healthy childless woman in her twenties will wet herself goes down from 'regularly incontinent' to about 2% or 3% per year. So most women reach the age of thirty without ever wetting themselves - but over a quarter of their friends *will* have done so. 

 

 

For serious research that asks: "What is actually going on in the general population, at all ages?", you need to look at published and peer-reviewed work sponsored by universal healthcare providers. 

Unfortunately, that kind of prevalence data is *always* locked against us, behind the paywall of a medical journal, despite it being funded by taxpayers in a country with an open healthcare system available to all. 

The exception is the Continus survey, conducted in Norway, Sweden, Finland and Denmark: see if it's available in your country. 

 

Huh, I had no idea it was that common. I'm a healthy,childless 19-year-old girl and I've been regularly incontinent since 14.

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1 hour ago, Padded_girl said:

If you don't mind me asking, is your incontinence severe or mild? Do you have to wear any protection and how does it affect your life?

Started off severe but it's now mild. I can wear panties most of the time but I do have to wear diapers sometimes, especially around the times I have my periods. It's gotten to the point where I can almost sorta predict when I'll need diapers or not. I got made fun of at school when it started, but there's not really much of an impact anymore. My cousin is in the same way, though I have it worse than she does.

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I overheard my dad and uncle talking about some military preparation prior to Desert Storm or maybe Afganistan.  Regardless, my Uncle was in the airforce and heard that many of the medical staff flying over to the Middle East were women, and that they were being flown over as fast as the air force could.  Which means they were using cargo planes to fly people over.  Due to the planes not having toilets, they gave the female medical staff adult diapers to wear and told them they needed to wear them during the flight.  I don't know if they medical staff were military or civilian.

 

Also, I would imagine surgical staff in general might have to wear protection as some surgeries could last several hours.  Medical staff would have to go through a painstaking process to "scrub out" and "scrub in" (as they call it) for sanitary reasons.  I would think wearing a diaper would alleviate the need to go through all this and allow the surgical staff to focus more on the patient.

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