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AquaVitae

💛 Gold Member
  • Content Count

    405
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    20

AquaVitae last won the day on May 8 2017

AquaVitae had the most liked content!

About AquaVitae

  • Rank
    Bursting
  • Birthday 07/02/1985

Social

  • Website URL
    https://fetlife.com/users/3864755

My Kinks

  • I'm into..
    Exhibitionism
    Foot play
    Humiliation
    Public humiliation
    Sadism / Masochism

Recent Profile Visitors

  1. Unfortunately this comes with the territory and there is no good solution. First, she is totally right. Of course it is Wrong for people to distribute her product, something that is basically a business for her. The problem is it takes just one person to download and distribute, and then the cat's out of the bag from there on out. One person. And that one person is enough to produce a huge discouraging effect on a small independent content producer such as herself. Now imagine if it's 5 people. I've never shared something I've bought without consent. I'm not cheap or broke. If I'm broke, well then I don't buy porn. Pretty simple. If it's reasonably priced and I have the money, I'll buy it because I know I'm supporting stuff I want to see. Also simple. For a while I wondered about the mentality of the person who buys the video and then posts it for free. I couldn't understand it. But I think I was thinking of it wrong. I don't think the pirateer comes from the group of buyers, I think they come from the subgroup of traders. There are people who simply trade videos. Only it's not really a trade because you still keep the copy of the thing you traded with. So both people come out with 2 videos having started with 1. But what that does is devalues the video that you end up getting, because you essentially got it for free. So I think that person is the one that ends up posting it up for mass download. At any rate, it's definitely a small minority of the community that does the most damage which, as per the Pareto principle, is the usual way of things. And the majority are the ones that deal with the consequences. Final note- I think the way you combat this as a content producer is you have to outpace the pirating. You produce more. Bigger producers do actively hunt down and remove videos efficiently (realwetting.com is a great example) but I imagine it must take a huge time commitment. Like you are dedicating X hours to that pursuit on a daily basis. Hard for an independent producer to do. But I notice that the smaller producers who make videos frequently, there's always a pretty significant delay before the videos show up on pirating sites.
  2. Been waiting for new stuff from your for a looooong time. Please do continue.
  3. I mean, fair point but was it necessary to necro a 2 year old post just to make it?
  4. Adriana Chechik. Big name mainstream porn actress known for "squirting" but it's basically her pissing everywhere when she gets fucked.. Not bad..
  5. The Youtube linking thing has been a persistent myth for years. I'm talking since any wetting videos starting being uploaded there, even prior to 2010. And I'm with Maki in the sentiment that it has become unbearably annoying to see people propagate this myth into 2020. It's tempting to believe because at a glance it does make some sense. You can easily know where traffic is coming from, and it's conceivably easy to flag certain sites that you know are fetish related. So you put 2 and 2 together and think that there is a simple algorithm that can be put into place that will then automatically flag/take down videos that are linked from certain sites. It's a fine hypothesis, except it doesn't actually happen. If there was an algorithm/bot doing that, you would expect consistent removal of any and all links that came from this site. Not just this site, but other places that used to be more popular such as Wetset. I have not seen this to be the case. I'll give you a recent example. In that thread someone posted a link that they broke up by putting spaces. I replied 3-4 hours after the initial post by putting the actual link in the post. As of this writing, that video is still up. If you pay attention to the nonsense over the years, you can also notice things going the other way around. Sometime videos from URLs broken by spaces were taken down within a day of being posted. So in other words, there is absolutely no consistent relationship between how you post a URL and if a video gets taken now. And it baffles my mind how some people think putting more spaces in a URL somehow confers a high level of protection. It's ridiculous. The thing that makes the most is that it is the high level of new traffic that leads to video takedown. Traffic from any source. High rate of video views = more visibility to censors human or otherwise. Also, high video views = more opportunity for someone to see the video who wants to flag it. And just so I'm not completely derailing the topic, Cmpunk the answer to your original question is very simple. Your everyday pee accidents are not being posted to Youtube because there is a much more appropriate app: Snapchat. The people who used to post that kind of stuff on Twitter or Youtube did so because there was no better place at the time. They weren't posting it for fetish reasons. They were posting because to them it was something funny they saw and wanted to share with their friends. If you give people an option to post such a video in an automatically temporary way vs. a permanent way, they are going to choose the temporary way. That's what Snapchat is. Before Snapchat, they didn't have as convenient as an option because you would need to go back and manually delete it if you wanted it to be temporary. And in general the culture of the internet has changed. The first viral videos were essentially us laughing at people who were being themselves. Star Wars Kid, Numa Numa guy, Chocolate Rain guy, Rebecca Black etc. This was the "Epic Fail" era of Youtube. Now viral videos aren't even a thing, and when they are it's people doing cool stuff or something that is manufactured by a bunch of writers in a room.
  6. Very cool account. See in that situation I feel like I'd have to say something. It's just too rare to pass up. As long as as you are remembering to reassess the situation, her body language, and her responses throughout the interaction then I think you can navigate these tricky situations. You're simply trying to find out if she feels the same as you do about what she did/what happened. And if it really is going sideways and getting more on the creep side, you can always say nice to meet you have a good night, and make a quick exit to have her feeling safe and comfortable again. Overall I think you had a good handle on things, from what you described. Maybe she was indeed just that drunk.
  7. This is really hot. Like stupid hot.
  8. That's because they broke up the goddamn link in TWO placed, operating under this silly superstition that big brother is watching and waiting to take down your fetish fodder Here, for God's sake:
  9. Yes. Youtube will regularly take down channels with NSFW content. But it has absolutely nothing to do with where it was linked. Breaking up the links is a practice that wastes the time of everyone involved and does absolutely nothing to prevent content removal. It still happens even when you do that.
  10. Google does no such thing. Please stop spreading this myth. And yes those are different women. First is someone named Maya and third is FluffyOmorashi. Dont recognize second.
  11. That's not ringing a bell. You might try to go to wetset.net and browse their video store to find it.
  12. I agree with Maki. This myth has existed for years that people are somehow monitoring site traffic and taking down videos based on that. It has lead to people doing annoying things like breaking up the link by putting multiple spaces and forcing you to copy/paste it back in to remove spaces. It's silly. There is no relationship.
  13. I watched the whole thing. Thought it was great. Not enough porn where they have sex after an accident, IMO.
  14. To the credit of @TVGuy he's the only major producer who is an active member of any online omo community, let alone the biggest one. For the life of me, I can't understand how so many of the pro's ignore this board. It's such an obviously good business move. On the one hand it is probably commendable that they choose not to come here if they know they have nothing to contribute besides transparent advertisement, but on the other hand it wouldn't take very much to lurk here a while, get a feel for the board, and then start making some worthwhile posts with advertisement sprinkled in here and there.
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