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TVGuy

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TVGuy last won the day on July 1

TVGuy had the most liked content!

About TVGuy

  • Rank
    Spielberg of Omorashi Videos
  • Birthday 06/20/1982

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  • Website URL
    http://HDwetting.com

Personal Information

  • My pronouns are..
    he/him

My Kinks

  • I'm into..
    Bathroom Control
    Bedwetting
    Diapers
    Tickling
    Watersports
    Bondage
    Cuddling
    Humiliation
    Spanking

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  1. I don't have any conflicting feelings regarding this subject and my fetish. Distinguishing between real life situations, and fantasy and role-play with willing partners are two entirely different things for me. The issue of "potty parity" is, I think, more complex than it might first seem. I do understand the perceived injustice here, of long lines for women while men have no line at all. It does seem inherently sexist and unfair. However, then becomes, what would be fair? And, who is the responsible party for making sure fairness is achieved? If achieving fairness in this realm requires equalizing the number of toilets or toilets/urinals between men and women's restrooms, I doubt this would result in businesses investing in more fixtures for women. A cheaper and easier solution to comply with any such mandate would be to simply remove some facilities for men. This wouldn't really fix the issue for women, it would just ensure the men's room also had a line. This would be more fair, but no one's situation would be improved by this. Other regulatory fixes might involve requiring larger women's restrooms in the first place in order to accommodate more stalls. But, would this then require a remodel of current facilities to comply? Who is the responsible party for paying for these changes? With such mandates carrying a significant price tag, many providers of publicly available facilities may simply decide that the expense is too much and opt to not provide any facilities at all. Again, this would be fair, but it doesn't actually improve the situation for anyone. Personally, I think the solution is just to move to a gender neutral bathroom model. Honestly, I'm not comfortable peeing at a urinal standing next to a stranger in any circumstance, regardless of if that stranger is a man or woman. Already there are plenty of situations where fathers are bringing their daughters into the men's room as to not leave them unattended is a busy public area, or situations where you may have a disabled person and caregiver who are of different sexes but who must enter the same restroom. So, its not like we aren't already at the point where you can use a public bathroom without necessarily encountering a person of a different sex. ------- Sometimes what is the most fair isn't what is the most beneficial. Take the famous thought experiment- Let us say that I have two identical cars. Both of which are in equal need of washing. So, I hire you and one of your friends to each wash one of my cars for me. And, I will give you a choice for how much I pay you- One option for payment is that I pay each of you $10 to wash one of my cars. This is completely fair and equitable. You are both getting an equal amount of pay to do the same job. However, I also give you a second option- I'll pay you $20 to wash one of my cars, twice as much as what I would pay you otherwise. But, if you take this offer, I'm going to pay your friend $500 to wash my other car. Your friend will be making substantially more than you for the same job. For the sake of argument, let us say this friend is particularly greedy and unwilling to share, so that is not a solution. If you take this option is extremely unfair to you. You are making way less money for doing the same job as your friend. With either option though, you are doing the same amount of work. With one, however, you are walking away with twice the cash in your pocket, but it is terribly unfair. What do you choose? Do you make the choice that is fair and equitable? Or do you make the choice that would give both you and your friend the maximum overall benefit, but that the expensive of fairness?
  2. Unable to hold it any longer, Alisha has a humiliating wetting accident in her jeans in public as traffic zooms by. In this super embarrassing video we get to spy on Alisha who is trapped in a rather dire set of circumstances. She is next to a busy public street, waiting for her friend to come pick her up, but she is bursting to pee. As we watch, Alisha frantically paces back and forth, squeezing her legs together, as she is on the phone telling her friend to hurry up. Alisha, however, is unable to wait a moment later. In an explosion of wetness her bladder releases, and a dark wet patch rapidly expands down the legs of her faded jeans. Horrified and humiliated she curses her friend for taking too long as she stands there, in public, clearly peeing in her pants.
  3. Right now, only the European Union and the state of California have regulations requiring any kind of removal of personal information or details upon request. Even then, these requests are limited to data that is considered, "personally identifying." I don't believe VK falls under either of those jurisdictions, so I don't think they have any legal obligation to remove your data.
  4. An LCD itself draws the image in an entirely different way than a CRT. It is possible to have processing electronics connected to an LCD display that can adapt an NTSC signal, this is how modern televisions sometimes have composite and s-video inputs. But NTSC, PAL, and SECAM were all designed to take advantage of the way a CRT draws the picture on the screen, with an electron beam steered by powerful magnetic fields scanning a raster pattern. LCDs address individual pixels in an array.
  5. I must have missed that era of consumer capture cards. By the time I started working in broadcasting we were using high-end Matrox cards that were uncompressed, but also provided RS422 deck control. Looking at consumer capture hardware now, it almost all seems to be USB based, which I assume must be doing some kind of compression as it seems like there would be difficulty in transporting an uninterrupted uncompressed video stream via USB. Funny you should mention this. There was a company, I think out of Indiana, that was producing specialty DSP boards just for this purpose. In broadcast style tape decks, all of the electronics are contained on easily swap-able cards. This way it would be easy for a station's in-house engineers to quickly swap out a bad TBC or control board and put the deck right back in service. A few years ago I became aware of this company that was producing modern DSP boards for old style Panasonic and Sony broadcast decks. Not just VHS, but 3/4 inch and BetaCam as well. The purpose was to get the best possibly quality playback for archival purposes. I have a couple old Panasonic broadcast style S-VHS decks, so I tried out one of their DSP boards. It worked fine, but I honestly couldn't perceive any quality difference when capturing from VHS or S-VHS. The rest of my workflow was the same, going through the Teranex, and their appeared to be no difference in quality. Even looking at the signal on my oscilloscope, it looked completely identical. So, I'm really not sure how much there was to be gained in doing this. This would be great, I am sure I am storing many terabytes of duplicated content. Unfortunately, when it comes to the business of video archival, many clients have very strict requirements regarding their data handling. A lot of it is just paranoia, and there is no real justifiable reason for it. But typical agreements require their content be handled in such a way that it is completely isolated from any other customer's content. Every device in the capture process must be air-gapped and access must be limited. One of the reasons I do so much processing with devices like the Teranex, instead of in software, is to satisfy these data handling requirements that restrict what devices their precious 1990's corporate training videos can touch. Computers, with built in memory, could possibly store some latent copy somewhere. So you are capturing playback from tape or some other kind of analog source then? What are you using for your capture hardware? If your capture hardware is compatible, might I suggest using VirtualDub to capture with? It is an old program now, but open source, so it doesn't cost anything. The benefit to using it is that it has built in tools for properly handling the frame rate conversion and de-interlacing, as well as correct color space conversion. This will let you starts with a video that has all the original visual information, motion cadence, and correct colors before you start working on enhancing it.
  6. I wasn't aware that any of the old PCI analog capture cards were truly uncompressed. I was working in broadcast at the time such cards were in common use, and it was my understanding that the time very drives could handle the sustained write rates involved with uncompressed video capture, even in the SD realm. Processing was also slow enough that most of the capture cards compressed to some sort of codec via hardware at the point of capture. The standard 25 Megabit DV codec was the most common. For cards that offer true, uncompressed, analog capture, I'm not finding much in the way of consumer grade hardware that offers this. There are some products from Matrox, but these are firmly in the realm of professional broadcast projects. At $595 the Blackmagic Decklink Studio 4K is the most affordable card I can find right now that offers true uncompressed analog signal capture. In regards to using S-video on VHS decks, I could be wrong, but it was my understanding that this wouldn't give you any benefit. This is because with VHS you are dealing with a single carrier for luminance and a modulated sub-carrier for chrominance. The color signal consists of harmonics that are between the harmonics of the baseband luma signal instead of both being in continuous frequency bands along side each other. The luma and chroma signals can be separated into separate Y and UV channels via comb filter, to give you an S-video signal, but this is only adding an extra analog processing phase and isn't giving you anything extra when dealing with VHS. S-VHS and Hi8 video have much greater luma signal bandwidth, and thus benefit from s-video connections which transport luma and chroma separately. For regular VHS, however, the signal on the tape itself has combined luma and chroma information so there is no benefit to separating them before capture. At my facility, when dealing with Analog video, I first convert the signal to SDI. Depending on the video source, I'll use either composite video, S-video, or component video analog output into a video time-base-corrector. The TBC generates a new timing signal, as often the video's control track is the most damaged in old formats as it sits at the very each of the tape. The TBC also lets me correct any levels that might have drifted, as well as address any tape wobble or distortion, and maintain consistent black and consistent white levels. The analog signal out of the TBC then goes to an analog/digital converter for conversion to SDI. In my case, I am using Blackmagic's Analog/Digital mini-converters. The signal is now digital, but not processed in any other way- It is still interlaced and in a YUV colorspace. That SDI signal is then routed through a Teranex standards converter which I use to convert the signal from interlaced to progressive scan while maintaining the original 60Hz or 50Hz motion cadence, convert the color space to RGB, and remove the 7.5 IRE analog setup level. That resulting uncompressed signal is then captured and ready to be compressed according to its intended delivery.
  7. I didn't mean to suggest doing the color space conversion via analog equipment, for the very reasons you cited, only with dedicated hardware meant for that purpose. For my business we use Teranex converters. I agree... Except that hardware capable of capturing an uncompressed video stream is expensive and not readily available at the consumer level. Yes, if uncompressed capture of the signal could be achieved the video format conversion could all be done in software in a way that is lossless. Many of the Snuppa videos, and other videos from that era, originated on MiniDV and were originally captured via firewire. This is why in the early 2000's we suddenly had an explosion of this kind of content. Despite being a digital format, MiniDV would still record an NTSC or PAL signal, complete with interlacing and in a YUV color space as the intended display medium was still a CRT television. Also, I deal with a lot of VHS in my mainstream business. I do not disagree in any way that VHS has less than 8 effective bits of signal quality... However, it has been my experience that to do the color space conversion you need to at least be working with an intermediate color space that gives you a greater bit depth. Due to the way a lot of video editing software works, you are artificially limited to the bit depth that you originally captured at... At least without taking various steps and engaging in work arounds to utilize an intermediate color space that gives you more room. Yes... Absolutely. In fact, with my mainstream business, we are working on training an in-house AI for uprezzing, stabalizing, and format conversion. When it works, it is absolutely amazing. We can take old, noisy, VHS footage and transform it into modern looking high-frame-rate 4K material. Unfortunately, we aren't quite at the place where it is reliable yet.
  8. Sorry guys! My college degree is actually in Motion Picture, Television, and Broadcast Technology. My thesis was actually on video signal format conversion, digitization, and encoding.
  9. Hey... So, I appreciate your work in restoring classic videos, and would like to talk with you about your process. In addition to HD Wetting, I have a mainstream business who's mission is to provide technology based solutions supporting broadcast, media, and streaming industries. A large part of my business is converting old media formats and restoring them. When dealing with many old video formats, we can divide the modernization of old videos into two distinct components. The first component being restoration, the second being enhancement. The problem with old video formats (NTSC, PAL, SECAM) is they were designed to produce a signal that would look good when displayed on a CRT display. Hallmarks of these old video signals are interlacing, where the display would flash alternating fields back and forth to produce the image, instead of a single continuous frame, and using a luminance based signal with U and V axis phasing to produce color. While this worked well with the way an electron gun drew a picture on a CRT display, modern displays are inherently progressive scan, drawing a full frame in its entirety, and with each pixel having a distinct RGB value. In modernizing these old video formats, the first challenge we have is in properly converting the signal from an interlaced YUV signal to a progressive scan RGB signal. Let us first just look at the de-interlacing component of the process, or the process of converting a frame made up of interlacing fields to a single continuous frame. Typical processes for capturing old video signals and converting them to a progressive scan signal usually result in a significant loss of information, often noticeably impacting image quality. This is why videos that you may recall watching on a CRT display, and not looking that bad, will look horrendous on a modern display. The issue is that there is no simple, easy way to convert interlaced frames to progressive scan frames. Here is why- The simplest thing to do would be simply to remove one of the interlaced fields, then double the lines of the remaining field. This is probably the most common thing we see in de-interlacing, as it is the easiest to do, but it has significant draw backs. By removing one of the fields, we immediately lose half of the visual information. Instantly, we are cutting the overall resolution in half. On top of that, we are reducing our apparent frame rate. With these interlaced signals, because of the way a CRT would flash the alternating fields, the motion cadence we would observe on a native interlaced display would be double the frame rate. So, in the case of an NTSC signal, at roughly 30 frames-per-second, we would actually be watching a motion cadence of 60Hz. The de-interlacing process, however, would cut in half not just our overall resolution, but also result in a 30Hz motion cadence. There are better ways to deal with de-interlacing, and a lot of different capture tools and video software are offering these methods. Rather than delete one of the fields, they will use some kind of algorithm to blend the frames together. This manages to maintain some of the resolution, but you still typically will lose half of the intended motion cadence. To truly restore an old video signal so it can be viewed on a modern display with its intended resolution and motion cadence, the following most be done- Each alternating field needs to be separated into its own distinct frame. The missing field from each frame should then be reconstructed using a high quality interpolative algorithm. This will maintain the original motion cadence of the signal, all of the original visual information will be present, and there won't be any perceived intra-frame loss of resolution. Unfortunately, this is not something you can do by just applying filters, as it involves re-timing and converting the original signal. Then there is the matter of converting YUV to RGB. Most people don't even bother with this, but the result will be colors that are noticeably off- This is why old video tapes typically have that particular look to their colors that reveal that they are from an old video. However, color science was fairly well established by the 90's and the colors of these old videos weren't supposed to look like that. You can approximate this with color correction after the video has been captures, but to truly bring back the video in the way it was intended there is a lot of math that is needed to convert between the two different color spaces. Additionally, this color space conversion should be done in hardware, before the signal is digitized. Most capture devices will only capture 8 bit video. Once you start shifting the color space of that 8 bit video, to move to the correct color space, you are going to have to shift outside of that 8 bit range. This means your corrected range will be closer to 5 or 6 bit video. You end up losing color information that was in the original, but can't be maintained when converting color spaces in an 8 bit arena. The hardware to do this is expensive, and an alternative would be to use a higher-end capture card that isn't limited to 8-bit capture. This will give you a greater bit-depth to work on when converting your color space, resulting in more information being retained when targeting an 8-bit format delivery. There are other elements to consider as well, like pixel aspect ratio, pixel sampling, and aspect ration conversion, and visual resolution theory as related to the Nyquist folding frequency of a pixel array in a certain color space. ------------------------------------- So that is some background on restoration. Of course what you are actually able to do will depend heavily on what you have to start with. Not having an original tape, or starting with a video signal that has already been improperly captured and converted will severely limit your ability to create a true restoration of the video. Once the video is restored to its intended color, motion, and resolution, you can then go on to enhance it it various ways, such as increasing its resolution, using modern color grading techniques, or in other ways. Watching the Snuppa video you provided here, there are several things I notice right away. One, is the video is at 24 frames per second. Neither NTSC video or PAL video was natively 24 frames per second, so the video isn't being shown at its intended frame rate or motion cadence. For NTSC we should be at 60Hz, or 50Hz if the source was PAL. I also notice that high-contrast vertical lines get wavey at times, which is an artifact of de-interlacing by blending two frames together. The black levels, and the lack of definition in the color of her shirt, also reveal that there was never a proper YUV to RGB conversion done on the color space. Now, it looks like you did some work with filters. It looks like there is quite a bit of noise suppression, but this noise suppression appears to be universal, which results in a lack of hair texture or cloth texture in her jeans. I would suggest targeting the noise reduction filter you are using to specific colors, so as to remove visible noise from large solid color areas without loosing detail in things like her hair. It also looks like you may have attempted some sort of uprezzing using an unsharpen mask, but it looks like your settings were maybe a little too aggressive, resulting in cleaner edges, but the loss of other visual details. Of course, this might have been all you were capable of doing. I don't know what your starting point was as far as a file, if you had access to an original tape, DVD, or if you were having to deal with a file that was already de-interlaced and had the colors baked into to the wrong color space.
  10. Alisha pees in her pants on purpose in order to avoid possibly having an accident later. In this scene we find Alisha at the end of a video shoot for HD Wetting. All the planned scenes have been shot, and she is about to get in her car and drive away. However, she is facing more than a two hour drive to get home and has been drinking lots of fluids for all the scenes she has been filming. She is concerned she is going to get on the road only to find herself desperate to pee. So, as a preventive measure, she chooses to pee in her pants now, before she starts driving home. This way, she figures, she is starting the drive with an empty bladder and will hopefully be able to avoid having an accident on her journey.
  11. I don't recall if it was the interview, or a photo set, or rehearsal video... My recollection is seeing some kind of media with Cat Chaser and Moppet that was set in Australia. I remember finding it odd, as previously it had been stated they were based in Seattle. Where did you learn that Fast Cat was deceased? I wouldn't be terribly surprised, but this is new information to me.
  12. I don't think we can say that the band just wasn't real at all. There are pictures/videos of their rehearsal. I just think that some of the stories of the band, as well as their success and popularity, were likely greatly exaggerated. Where the reality and the fantasy of this band meet, however, is a bit of a mystery.
  13. This video gives us an incredible close-up view of Alisha peeing in her jeans. It is a beautiful day and Alisha is outdoors, enjoying the warm weather. She needs to pee, and decides that it would be fun to just pee in her pants. She invites us to watch via an extreme close-up shot as she wets herself. The close-up shot is incredible, letting us see every tiny detail, clearly making out the denim fibers of her jeans as she pees. Her pants grow visibly dark with wetness, and glistening rivulets stream across the surface of the fabric. After she is done peeing we go back to a wide-shot, letting us view her soaked jeans in their entirety. Choosing to leave her wet pants on, because she enjoys the sensation of soaked fabric on a warm day, she says goodbye and the scene comes to an end.
  14. If what I had read on the old Cat Chaser Conspiracy band website was true, Fast Cat would have been an adult in the 1970's. So let us say he was 20 years old in 1979. Moppet, if her reported age was correct, would have been 16 in 1999 when my friend Betsy and I attempted to go see Cat Chaser perform in Seattle. This would mean that Moppet was born in 1983, and Fast Cat would have been at least 24 years older than her. He would have had to of been at least 40 when he was dating her when she was 16... That is kind of creepy. However, I still really question how much of this is true, at all. For one, many of the Wetset photos and interviews with Moppet purportedly were done in Australia. But, Fast Cat reportedly found Moppet living on the streets of Seattle. If she were truly the age that has been reported, and a run away, how would she have been able to travel internationally? Any such international travel would have required a passport, and if she had been reported as a runaway, attempting to get or use a passport would have drawn immediate law enforcement attention. Here is another thread about Cat Chaser Conspiracy that has a lot more info-
  15. In the fall of 1999 I was just barely 17 years old. My friend Betsy, who was into wetting, and I had decided to take a little trip to Seattle to visit a mutual friend, but also to check out this band, "Cat Chaser Conspiracy." This was infamous band talked about in Wetset magazine, made up entirely of young women who would pee themselves on stage, and attracting audiences of young women who would also wet themselves in solidarity. Wetset had published a schedule of their upcoming performances, so we figured we would attempt to go to one. We managed to find the venue, but no such band was listed in their lineup. Asking at the box office didn't get us any results either- No one at that venue had ever heard of, Cat Chaser Conspiracy, despite wetset claiming they had performed there several times. After getting back home, and reading into it more on the band's website, I learned that the band was an invention of a man calling himself Fast Cat, who claimed to be a part of the Seattle Grunge scene since the 1970's, but had traveled the world as a part of various famous rock and roll bands. He claimed to have recruited all of the girls to join Cat Chaser Conspiracy. I began to suspect that the band was more of a fantasy, or an idea that he was trying to manifest as reality, but wasn't quite there yet. But, he still tried to sell the idea that the band was up and running and booking gigs. This is just my suspicion, as there were photos of the band on Wetset, lyrics published on the band's website, and a schedule of their upcoming appearances that listed real venues. Contacting those venues, though, resulted in staff that had never heard of this band. It was also impossible to find any of their music, even if you wanted to buy it. There was a single MP3 that purported to be from one of their concerts, but all you could hear was a bunch of crowd noise and some distorted instruments. If one were to believe everything that Fast Cat wrote on the band's website, then Moppet was only 14 and a runaway when she was rescued by Fast Cat and recruited into the band. She would also have been only 14 in her photo sets in Wetset magazine. Fast Cat also claimed to have coined the spelling of the word "girl" as "gurl," been the first to popularize wetting as a sexual fetish, and even to have accidentally traveled through time at one point. I would love to know the truth here. The whole saga fascinated me when I was young- The idea that such a band might exist was incredible, but that someone could make up such an elaborate fiction backed with the photo sets, the website, the interviews, and everything else... Well, that was even more intriguing to me. Where the reality and fantasy of Cat Chaser Conspiracy meet is a mystery. One can't write it off as being complete make believe, but one also has to acknowledge that much of the band's existence and story was pure fiction.
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