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Dynamic

Active Member
  • Content Count

    238
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About Dynamic

  • Rank
    Leaking
  • Birthday 03/31/1983

Personal Information

  • My pronouns are..
    he/him

My Kinks

  • I'm into..
    Bathroom Control
    Bedwetting
    Diapers
    Biting
    Bondage
    Crossdressing
    Cuddling
    Tomboys

Recent Profile Visitors

5,649 profile views
  1. Dude. Don't lose sight of what writing fiction is - a means of expressing yourself. You shouldn't be concerned with your audience if it means overlooking the most important member, which is, and always will be, yourself. You have to write what you want to write. Moreover, you have to write what you want to read. The quickest way to mediocrity is to involve the committee. I suggest you take a serious, hard look at yourself and your own motivations for writing. If you don't have something you desperately want to share with the world, then perhaps you're looking in the wrong plac
  2. I guess the closest to what I like to write would be the techno-thriller genre. As you can imagine, there aren't a lot of AB/DL or Omo themed techno-thrillers, but that's what I like to write. It's been a very long time since I wrote anything in that very specific vein, but when I did I wasn't the most popular writer, but I did get some pretty die-hard fans, which was cool. That's strange, because as a man that's exactly what I'm doing when I look at myself in the mirror. In seriousness, this is a trend that is very common with younger male writers. That isn't to say that older
  3. I used to have a lot of trouble with dialog as well. Actually, I may still have trouble as it's been a while since I've released anything for other people to read. What helped me was to dabble a bit in fanfiction. Using characters from a show that I know very well makes writing dialog a little more straightforward since I can easily envision how they would talk and react to situations. Porting that knowledge to original characters is a challenge all its own, but either way it's still a good exercise in my opinion.
  4. I know this is a somewhat old thread, but I'll bite: What do you think about the application of Aristotle's Seven Golden Rules in fiction writing? Personally, I've struggled with a little bit of it (chorus for example) but I think it's a good framework overall. I feel that not enough authors think about structure or theme when they approach their writing.
  5. The real questions is did she ever change her smoke alarm battery?
  6. I like the premise of this story. Coming up with rules for these kinds of challenges really appeals to me. Stories revolving around more genuine situations are always fun, but there's something special about this kind where the characters are purposefully putting themselves into situations where they will have "accidents." I know it's not the point, but a little more background would make it a bit more immersive. Obviously they're on a road trip, but where are they going anyway?
  7. After going over my notes (I keep a detailed log of... things) I've noticed that there is actually a lot of variation. I'm a little too shy to share my findings here for everybody, but suffice to say accidents come in many flavors. If anyone is especially interested in my experiences feel free to PM me.
  8. I think I can sort of relate so I'll give my 2 cents. Much of the appeal of diapers for me is what they represent psychologically. When you're wearing a diaper, it's sort of an admission that you have little or no control over some of your most basic functions, and for some reason that admission is really appealing to me. Extrapolating from there, my guess is that being able to "make it" to the toilet while still admitting that next time you might not make it has something to do with the appeal. Pull-ups accentuate this really well since they bridge the gap between regular clothes and
  9. This is more or less true in my experience as well, but if done correctly those involuntary leaks can still make a huge mess. If you load up on a lot of water then you may not experience a strong loss of control, but if you're drinking something that is very irritating to the bladder then you will experience some pretty intense bladder contractions once it gets full. Over time these contractions will weaken the external urethral sphincter, making voluntary holding more and more difficult. Once that muscle is too weak to fight back the pressure, during a bladder contraction you'll lose contr
  10. I never had much use for HDLs, though I am slowly beginning to understand their importance (I think we did VHDL in school). FPGAs are somewhat interesting to me, especially how they are being used to keep legacy hardware and software alive, such as in old gaming stuff. In school I mostly focused on programming microcontrollers for driving things such as USB peripherals. I had planned to do things in robotics as well but that has yet to materialize. Thanks for the well wishes, but I don't actually work in that field right now. Most of my experience was in school, and I do miss it, but
  11. It works by lowering your body's vasopressin levels. Vasopressin is also called "antidiuretic hormone", and it helps to moderate the levels of water in your system. As I understand it, using the rapid desperation technique produces a more natural diuretic response by essentially telling your body that you're getting a lot of water and it had better get rid of some, so it ramps up urine production. I don't understand the mechanism behind this, but lower vasopressin means you'll have to pee more. Really low vasopressin means you'll have to pee a whole lot more. It's actually kind of mind bo
  12. Ah, I see. That sounds very computer-sciencey to me, so I'm a little out of my wheelhouse here. My area of study was circuits and embedded systems programming, so I tend to look at the machine as an electronic device rather than the theoretical machine necessary for the functional paradigm. I've had a really hard time trying to learn functional concepts because getting too high level makes me uncomfortable. I do want to learn Rust, though. That being said, I don't even program that much so I'm by far not an expert. I wouldn't even consider myself on the level of motivated hobbyist, i
  13. I don't know anything about Haskell really, but I do have a little experience in programming. Mostly C in embedded systems which, I know, is totally different. I'm just curious as to why you want to learn Haskell. Any particular reason or just some kind of curiosity? If you're into functional isn't Rust the go to thing right now? I know it's not purely functional, but still?
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