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I remembered this story after reading @theGAME420's story: https://www.omorashi.org/forums/topic/44275-desperate-flight-home/

 

This happened to me roughly a decade ago. As I always did on air trips, I visited the bar and chugged a couple beers for my flight. I love flying tipsy. This time I was wearing khaki pants and a button-up shirt, and I might have had a few more beers than usual, maybe there was a long layover, but my bladder was filling pretty fast. It wouldn't normally be a problem though...

I used the restroom and got on the plane, then after several minutes of boarding, the plane taxied out to the runways. My bladder was already almost full again, but I figured everything would be fine and we'd be in the air in no time. But alas, we got delayed for takeoff, and they kept the seatbelt lights on. They said it was estimated to be 5 minutes, but after that time passed, they re-estimated it at another 5 minutes. I was getting pretty desperate at this point, but I still thought we'd be in the air in no time. They kept extending the delay time, but I kept thinking there's only so far they can extend it. Whatever it was, I can understand if it takes longer than they expected, but it must be almost over by now, right? I was squirming in my seat, trying to keep my mind off how much I had to pee. I figured if I just thought about something else, the time would pass before I knew it.

I was getting to the point where I almost felt like I was going to wet my pants, and I was still clinging to the hope we'd take off soon, while also building up the courage to run to the toilet anyway. The plane finally started taxiing so I figured oh thank goodness we'll be in the air soon! (I had forgot how long it takes to get to cruising altitude btw, that's some foreshadowing for you.😉) The plane taxied to the start of the runway, and I heard the engines begin to spool up, and I waited for that deafening roar when they spin up and you get shoved back in the seat. But the plane stayed there, engines running at the ready state. And it stayed there for a few minutes. I was bouncing in my seat trying not to pee in my pants. They announced over the intercom that we'd be delayed for a few more minutes, and assured us we'd be in the air soon. I'd not have believed them, if it hadn't been for the additional assurance. But ten minutes later I was again beginning to work up the courage to jet to the toilets. In fact right as I had finally decided I was going to go, and was undoing my seatbelt, the engines began to spool up. I stopped and waited for a moment. The plane engines roared up to full and the plane began accelerating down the runway. We were finally going in the air.

At this point I was so close to wetting myself that I couldn't focus on anything else. I just kept telling myself I'd just wait until we get to cruising altitude. The plane kept climbing and climbing. My ears popped. And they popped again. The roar of the engines gave way to the soft hiss of the air circulation system, as the change in air pressure altered the way everything sounded to my ears. I was squirming, trying not to pee when suddenly a spurt of pee came out. I started to get more scared and frantic. As much as I normally enjoyed holding and having accidents at home, I was completely terrified of having one in public, especially stuck on a plane with no spare clothing. My time was running out, but I knew I could hang on at least for a couple more minutes. The plane kept climbing higher. We were above the clouds by now. The cities on the ground looked like little latticework designs from up here. But we were still climbing. I kept shifting in my seat, trying to keep my mind off my ever-growing need. Suddenly another spurt came out, bigger this time, and it dampened the front of my pants. I was afraid to let out much more than that for fear of being seen with wet pants. I was bouncing up and down like crazy, just waiting for the plane to FINALLY GET TO CRUISING ALTITUDE!! We began to pass through the second cloud layer. STILL NOT DONE CLIMBING!!

The plane got lost in this cloud layer, it was thick and it was dark inside. The lights on the plane illuminated the wings, and the fog-lights shone off into the distance, penetrating the water droplets to reveal just more water droplets endlessly. I tried to appreciate the beautiful yet dreary scenery to get my mind off of more pressing matters. At this point I was so certain that relief was imminent that I decided to squeeze my sphincter shut extra tight to make sure I didn't get my pants any more wet. We finally reached cruising altitude amidst the clouds, but the seatbelt light stayed illuminated. I watched it in anticipation. Still illuminated. Still illuminated...

The captain spoke over the intercom and said we were going to be experiencing turbulence, and that the fasten seatbelt sign was going to remain lit until the turbulence passed. Great, now it's an even bigger safety concern if I get up while the light's on! My sphincter was on its last waning bits of energy and starting to weaken. I had wasted energy trying to stay dry, and if I didn't get to the toilet imminently, that effort was going to backfire! Another spurt came out, as if to say hurry up, your time is short! I frantically scanned the aisle, measured the rate of turbulence, gauged how I felt about my balance, began to plan the walk to the toilet including handholds for support, noted that the flight attendants were buckled up and the aisle was empty, and I paused for a moment, ready to go but trying to wait till the last moment.

A fourth spurt and I decided I couldn't wait anymore. I unbuckled my belt and fastwalked down the aisle, and right into the restroom. As I was approaching, I felt my urgency grow suddenly, and it conjured up feelings and memories of all the other times I'd been this desperate while running towards a toilet. I knew I had a list of things to do before I sat down to pee: I had to shut the door, lock the door, unbutton my pants, take them down, and finally sit down. I knew I was probably going to have a tiny accident in the process. Normally what I'd do in this situation is stand still at the toilet, dressed, appreciating the urgency of the moment. But this time I was trying to weigh my determination to stay dry with the likelihood my efforts to do so would even help much. I decided it probably wasn't going to make much difference, better enjoy it now while I can. I reached the door and in one smooth motion, without stopping walking, I opened it, entered, and shut it.

Now I was trapped in this tiny space, no room to move about. I pee-danced frantically while I locked the door, and sure enough, I had a fifth spurt of pee into my pants. Being finally alone, I got turned on and did what I usually do, I kept my pants on for a moment and stood still, focusing every fibre of my being into not peeing into my pants. A couple more tiny spurts came out, but not enough to make much difference at this point. There was already a huge wet patch on my pants, though fortunately it was already drying pretty quickly, and the khaki color didn't show the wetness nearly as much as blue jeans would have. I thought, finally, everything was going to be okay. The relief seemed to actually make it easier to hold, so I just stood there for several seconds, admiring that. Finally I urinated into the toilet and I was so turned on I began to pleasure myself. Being slightly drunk I found it difficult to climax, and the flight attendant knocked on the door to ask if everything was fine. I finished up and went back to my seat, got a few looks from the flight attendants, but otherwise everything was fine. It was so peaceful, I thought I should have gone way earlier. But then I wouldn't have had this story to tell. It was not 2 minutes after I sat down that the seat belt light came off, and it made me wonder what would have happened if I had just waited those last few minutes. As satisfying as it would have been to achieve that, however, I think it likely I would have wet myself quite a lot more. I guess you can imagine that as an alternate ending if you like. 😉

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Interesting story, though getting drunk before or while flying really isn’t a good idea and it surprises me how many people on this site do it. 

Also you really tried hard with the airplane terminology but none of it was correct lol.

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5 hours ago, BENAir01 said:

Interesting story, though getting drunk before or while flying really isn’t a good idea and it surprises me how many people on this site do it.

It's my military exposure. The Marines taught me to drink, and I found it enjoyable at the right times. It sort of just became a thing I did.

I finally managed to give up on it at one point, and made a flight without drinking. I intend to make that my new habit, since I've had it backfire three times now.

 

5 hours ago, BENAir01 said:

Also you really tried hard with the airplane terminology but none of it was correct lol.

What terminology was I incorrect about?

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9 hours ago, thereaverofdarkness said:

I had forgot how long it takes to get to cruising altitude btw, that's some foreshadowing for you.😉

Well first of all, in most countries, unless there’s turbulence (which obviously there was for you), the seatbelt sign is turned off at 10,000 feet, usually only about 5 minutes into the flight. 

9 hours ago, thereaverofdarkness said:

The plane taxied to the start of the runway, and I heard the engines begin to spool up, and I waited for that deafening roar when they spin up and you get shoved back in the seat. But the plane stayed there, engines running at the ready state

If we’re getting technical,

1) you don’t say the engines spin up. Spool up or increase thrust is better. 

2) the engines aren’t in the “ready state”. As long as the engines are on, they’re always ready. When a plane turns into the runway and starts its roll, thrust is usually increased to between 20 and 40%, depending on the plane, and once thrust is stable there, it is then increased to takeoff power, which depending on the type of plane, heat, runway length, and altitude of the airport, FLEX power can be from 70 or 80-100% power. 

9 hours ago, thereaverofdarkness said:

roared up to full

This just sounds wrong haha

9 hours ago, thereaverofdarkness said:

air circulation system

Again getting technical but it would most likely be the air conditioner or the pressurization

9 hours ago, thereaverofdarkness said:

The lights on the plane illuminated the wings, and the fog-lights shone off into the distance

Planes don’t have fog lights lol. There are a few different lights you would have seen. Under 10,000 feet, the landing lights would be on. Those are the ones on the front of the wings right next to the fuselage that face forward and are very bright. Then on the end of the wings, there are navigation lights which are always on from the time of pushback, they are red in one side and green in the other. Then there are strobe lights. Those are the white lights next to the Navi lights that blink really brightly. And then there are a few other lights like position lights, anti collision lights, beacons, and wing lights that you can’t see from the cabin. 

 

Also one thing to note obviously you were not injured going to the bathroom with the seat key sign on but the pilots do put them on for a reason, don’t think that just because in this one Incesent this person was okay that it’s okay to ignore the fasten seatbelt sign. Only get up if you’re truly having an emergency, and even then be careful and only do it if you can feel that the turbulence is light. People have doed bubkti having their seatbelts on in turbulence before. 

Again, overall it was an excellent piece. And please don’t take any offense to these minor and in the grand scheme of things irrelevant corrections. 

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Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, BENAir01 said:

Well first of all, in most countries, unless there’s turbulence (which obviously there was for you), the seatbelt sign is turned off at 10,000 feet, usually only about 5 minutes into the flight. 

Sure but 5 minutes can be a long time. But I think the time spent climbing is longer than 5 minutes, even if they usually turn off the seatbelt sign earlier.

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If we’re getting technical,

1) you don’t say the engines spin up. Spool up or increase thrust is better. 

I didn't work in test cell or operational level, I worked in powerplants. We didn't use that terminology and we were elbow-deep in engine grease. I feel like you'd have to be an aircraft technician to feel that "spin up" is incorrect terminology. Besides, they spin but they aren't a spool, so isn't spool the one that's wrong?

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2) the engines aren’t in the “ready state”. As long as the engines are on, they’re always ready.

I was just trying to find a term to describe that they weren't at high power for takeoff. Harsh.

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Again getting technical but it would most likely be the air conditioner or the pressurization

The little vents that blow air constantly. The plane is equipped with an air refreshment system to ensure the cabin oxygen and carbon-dioxide levels stay where they should be. When my ears pop, everything sounds different. The roar of the engines fades into the background noise and I suddenly become more aware of the hiss of air coming out of those vents, and the little fans they have running to propel the air through.

Quote

Planes don’t have fog lights lol. There are a few different lights you would have seen.

Yeah well the lights were penetrating the fog!!

Quote

Also one thing to note obviously you were not injured going to the bathroom with the seat key sign on but the pilots do put them on for a reason, don’t think that just because in this one Incesent this person was okay that it’s okay to ignore the fasten seatbelt sign. Only get up if you’re truly having an emergency, and even then be careful and only do it if you can feel that the turbulence is light. People have doed bubkti having their seatbelts on in turbulence before.

Very true! Safety is really why I risked an accident to stay in my seat. It's really not as unsafe as some people describe it, but safety is especially important when you're stuck in a room full of people who could also be hurt by your actions, and you won't be having access to medical services for a few hours. I really wish more people would take safety more seriously.

Hmm...if they did, it might lead to more "accidents"... :nosebleed:

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Again, overall it was an excellent piece. And please don’t take any offense to these minor and in the grand scheme of things irrelevant corrections. 

I don't take offense at all! Thanks for taking the time to respond! The best part of telling a story is the audience!

Edited by thereaverofdarkness

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When us posters try to describe a situation involving technical matters outside of our areas of expertise, we're bound to make misstatements and errors.  I enjoyed the initial report and learned something from the corrections, so both you guys can wear your badges right-side-up for the rest of the day.

Especially when a departure is delayed, I've often noted a number of passengers in the bar to pass the time.  

Reaver, if you had waited for the seat belt light to go out, there might have been a rush for the toilets and you would have had to stand in line.  Not easy to do with a bladder as full as yours!

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9 minutes ago, Spectator9 said:

Reaver, if you had waited for the seat belt light to go out, there might have been a rush for the toilets and you would have had to stand in line.  Not easy to do with a bladder as full as yours!

Exactly! Fun to imagine, though.

I've also always been the passive type and I'll let people push in front of me when they try to. In boot camp I once had to pee really bad. We were all supposed to be standing at attention and perfectly still, but I was squirming trying not to wet myself. I asked the drill instructor if I could use the restroom and I was denied. Finally, a while later, they sent everyone into the restroom. Everyone else barged past me and I was left standing by the wall waiting for a toilet to open up. I had just barely started when they called us out, and I only got about 25% relief. It was enough, though. It seemed kind of messed up though, that I was the one who needed the toilet most, yet I got last dibs on it.

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WOW great story. Glad you made it in the end. Did you have to pee a lot during the flight becuase of the drinks

Like later on I mean 

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2 hours ago, AudreyLovesPee said:

Did you have to pee a lot during the flight becuase of the drinks

Yeah, I did. I tried to wait until the end of the flight, but it was too much and I ended up using the restroom a second time in-flight. I didn't wet again, but I was pretty weak so it kind of snuck up on me and I almost did.

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13 hours ago, thereaverofdarkness said:

Yeah, I did. I tried to wait until the end of the flight, but it was too much and I ended up using the restroom a second time in-flight. I didn't wet again, but I was pretty weak so it kind of snuck up on me and I almost did.

wow

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